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Definition of “move” - English Dictionary

"move" in British English

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moveverb

uk   /muːv/  us   /muːv/
  • move verb (CHANGE POSITION)

A2 [I or T] to (​cause to) ​changeposition: I'm so ​cold I can't move my ​fingers. Will you ​help me move this ​table to the back ​room? Can we move (= ​change the ​time of) the ​meeting from 2 p.m. to 3.30 p.m. ? Don't move! Stay ​right where you are. I ​thought I could ​hear someone moving about/aroundupstairs. If you move along/over/up (= go ​further to the ​side, back, or ​front) a little, Tess can ​sit next to me. Police ​officers at the ​scene of the ​accident were ​askingpeople to move along/on (= to go to a different ​place). Come on, it's ​time we were moving (= ​time for us to ​leave). Let's ​stay here ​tonight, then move on (= ​continueourjourney)tomorrowmorning.
[I or T] to ​change the ​position of one of the ​pieces used in a ​boardgame: In ​chess, the ​pieces can only move in ​certaindirections.

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  • move verb (CHANGE PLACE)

B1 [I] to go to a different ​place to ​live or ​work: We're moving to Paris. They've ​bought a new ​house, but it will need a lot of ​work before they can move into it/move in. I ​hear Paula has moved in with her ​boyfriend (= gone to ​live in his ​house). The ​couple next ​door moved away (= went to ​livesomewhereelse) last ​year. A lot of ​businesses are moving out of London because it's too ​expensive.
move house B1 UK
to ​leaveyourhome in ​order to ​live in a new one: We're moving ​house next ​week.

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  • move verb (PROGRESS)

[I or T] to (​cause to) ​progress, ​change, or ​happen in a ​particular way or ​direction: The judge's ​decision will ​allow the ​case to move forward. If you ​want to move ahead in ​yourcareer, you'll have to ​workharder. Share ​prices moved up/downslowlyyesterday. Sophie has been moved up/down a ​grade at ​school. It's ​time this ​company moved into (= ​started to take ​advantage of the ​benefits of) the ​digitalage.

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  • move verb (CHANGE OPINION)

[I or T] to (​cause to) ​change an ​opinion or the way in which you ​live or ​work: He's made up his ​mind, and nothing you can say will move him on the ​issue. More and more ​people are movingaway from/towardsvegetarianism.
  • move verb (FEELINGS)

B2 [T] to ​cause someone to have ​strongfeelings, such as ​sadness, ​sympathy, ​happiness, or ​admiration: She said that she was deeply moved by all the ​letters of ​sympathy she had ​received. It was such a ​sadfilm that it moved him to ​tears (= made him ​cry).
  • move verb (BE WITH PEOPLE)

[I + adv/prep] to ​spendtime with ​people: She moves in/among a very ​smallcircle of ​people.
  • move verb (SUGGEST)

[I or T] specialized politics, law to ​suggest something, ​especiallyformally at a ​meeting or in a ​lawcourt: A ​vote was just about to be taken when someone ​stood up and said that they ​wished to move an ​amendment. [+ that] I move that the ​proposal be ​accepted. Your Honour, we ​wish to move fordismissal of the ​charges.
  • move verb (PASS)

[I or T] polite word (used ​especially by ​doctors and ​nurses) to ​pass the ​contents of the ​bowels out of the ​body: The ​doctorasked him if he'd moved his ​bowels that ​day.

movenoun

uk   /muːv/  us   /muːv/
  • move noun (CHANGE OF POSITION)

C2 [S] an ​act of moving: She ​held the ​gun to his ​head and said, "One move and you're ​dead!" I ​hate the way my ​boss watches my every move (= ​watches everything I do).
[C] in some boardgames, a ​change of the ​position of one of the ​pieces used to ​play the ​game, or a ​change of ​position that is ​allowed by the ​rules, or a player's ​turn to move ​theirpiece: It ​takes a ​longtime to ​learn all the moves in ​chess. It's ​your move.

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  • move noun (CHANGE OF PLACE)

C1 [C] an ​occasion when you go to ​live or ​work in a different ​place: We've had four moves in three ​years.

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  • move noun (ACTION)

C1 [C] an ​action taken to ​achieve something: Buying those ​shares was a good move. This move towardsimprovingchildcarefacilities has been ​widelywelcomed. [+ to infinitive] The ​citycouncil is making a move toimprovetrafficflow in the ​city.
make the first move
to be the first to take ​action: Neither ​sideseemsprepared to make the first move towards ​reaching a ​peaceagreement.
informal to ​start a ​romantic or ​sexualrelationship with someone: She's ​liked him for a ​longtime, but doesn't ​want to make the first move.

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(Definition of move from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"move" in Business English

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moveverb

uk   us   /muːv/
[I or T] to go to a different ​place in ​order to ​live or ​work, or to make someone do this: The ​company announced it would be moving ​staff from Houston to Dallas early next ​year.move to/into a place I got a ​promotion last ​year that ​meant moving to Brussels. For many ​years the ​trend has been for ​people to move from ​rural to ​urbanareas.
[I or T] if a ​store, ​office, ​factory, etc. moves, or if someone moves it, it becomes ​situated in another ​place: move to/from a place The bank's ​headquarters have now moved to Amsterdam.move offices/headquarters/operations Airline ​operations are in the ​process of being moved to Terminal 2.
[I or T] to ​change the ​job that you do, or to make someone do this: If you're not happy ​working in your ​currentteam, we can move you.move sb to sth After only six months at the ​firm, he was moved to ​sales.move to/from/into sth She ​wants to move into ​corporatefinance.
[I] to take ​action or make ​progress: One ​financialanalyst said the ​court decision could ​prompt the ​company to move more quickly on the ​issue.move ahead/forward/away from sth The ​state is moving ​ahead with ​legislationreforms for ​smallbusinesses.
[I or T] COMMERCE if a ​product moves, or if a ​store, ​company, etc. moves it, it ​sells quickly: Our latest ​range of ​Internet TVs is really moving.
formal MEETINGS to ​officially suggest something during a ​meeting: move that I move that we ​adopt the ​resolution.

movenoun

uk   us   /muːv/
[C] action that a ​person or ​organizationtakes in ​order to ​achieve something: a move to do sth Moves to ​blockfreeaccess to music on the ​Internet have ​met with ​limitedsuccess.a move by sb/sth Economists said a move by Japan to ​cutinterestrates in ​isolation would have little ​effect on ​currencylevels.make a move (to do sth) Moves are being made to ​help future ​doctors make ​objective decisions.first/next/latest move Our next move will crucially depend on the latest ​figures for ​inflation.a bold/strategic/dramatic move Strategic moves announced with the ​interimresults should ​strengthen the ​balance sheet and ​improvecashflow.a move comes/follows The company's move comes as ​part of a wider ​industry crackdown on ​insurancefraud.applaud/approve/condemn a move Investors are expected to applaud the move.
[S] the ​process of ​changing from one ​system, ​activity, etc. to another: a move to/into sth Environmentalists have welcomed the move to congestion ​charging.a move (away) from sth We have ​incorporated several new ​concepts in recent months, ​including a move from commission-only ​staff to a ​teambonusstructure.
[C] the ​process of ​changing the ​place where you ​live or ​work, or ​trading in a new ​place: a move from/to/into a place The move into Italy is ​part of a wider ​internationalexpansion.
(Definition of move from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“move” in Business English

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