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Definition of “move” - English Dictionary

"move" in British English

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moveverb

uk   /muːv/ us   /muːv/
  • move verb (CHANGE POSITION)

A2 [I or T] to (cause to) change position: I'm so cold I can't move my fingers. Will you help me move this table to the back room? Can we move (= change the time of) the meeting from 2 p.m. to 3.30 p.m. ? Don't move! Stay right where you are. I thought I could hear someone moving about/around upstairs. If you move along/over/up (= go further to the side, back, or front) a little, Tess can sit next to me. Police officers at the scene of the accident were asking people to move along/on (= to go to a different place). Come on, it's time we were moving (= time for us to leave). Let's stay here tonight, then move on (= continue our journey) tomorrow morning.
[I or T] to change the position of one of the pieces used in a board game: In chess, the pieces can only move in certain directions.

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  • move verb (CHANGE PLACE)

B1 [I] to go to a different place to live or work: We're moving to Paris. They've bought a new house, but it will need a lot of work before they can move into it/move in. I hear Paula has moved in with her boyfriend (= gone to live in his house). The couple next door moved away (= went to live somewhere else) last year. A lot of businesses are moving out of London because it's too expensive.
move house B1 UK
to leave your home in order to live in a new one: We're moving house next week.

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  • move verb (PROGRESS)

[I or T] to (cause to) progress, change, or happen in a particular way or direction: The judge's decision will allow the case to move forward. If you want to move ahead in your career, you'll have to work harder. Share prices moved up/down slowly yesterday. Sophie has been moved up/down a grade at school. It's time this company moved into (= started to take advantage of the benefits of) the digital age.

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  • move verb (BE WITH PEOPLE)

[I + adv/prep] to spend time with people: She moves in/among a very small circle of people.
  • move verb (SUGGEST)

[I or T] specialized politics, law to suggest something, especially formally at a meeting or in a law court: A vote was just about to be taken when someone stood up and said that they wished to move an amendment. [+ that] I move that the proposal be accepted. Your Honour, we wish to move for dismissal of the charges.
  • move verb (PASS)

[I or T] polite word (used especially by doctors and nurses) to pass the contents of the bowels out of the body: The doctor asked him if he'd moved his bowels that day.

movenoun

uk   /muːv/ us   /muːv/
  • move noun (CHANGE OF POSITION)

C2 [S] an act of moving: She held the gun to his head and said, "One move and you're dead!" I hate the way my boss watches my every move (= watches everything I do).
[C] in some board games, a change of the position of one of the pieces used to play the game, or a change of position that is allowed by the rules, or a player's turn to move their piece: It takes a long time to learn all the moves in chess. It's your move.

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  • move noun (CHANGE OF PLACE)

C1 [C] an occasion when you go to live or work in a different place: We've had four moves in three years.

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  • move noun (ACTION)

C1 [C] an action taken to achieve something: Buying those shares was a good move. This move towards improving childcare facilities has been widely welcomed. [+ to infinitive] The city council is making a move to improve traffic flow in the city.
make the first move
to be the first to take action: Neither side seems prepared to make the first move towards reaching a peace agreement.
informal to start a romantic or sexual relationship with someone: She's liked him for a long time, but doesn't want to make the first move.

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(Definition of move from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"move" in Business English

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moveverb

uk   /muːv/ us  
[I or T] to go to a different place in order to live or work, or to make someone do this: The company announced it would be moving staff from Houston to Dallas early next year.move to/into a place I got a promotion last year that meant moving to Brussels. For many years the trend has been for people to move from rural to urban areas.
[I or T] if a store, office, factory, etc. moves, or if someone moves it, it becomes situated in another place: move to/from a place The bank's headquarters have now moved to Amsterdam.move offices/headquarters/operations Airline operations are in the process of being moved to Terminal 2.
[I or T] to change the job that you do, or to make someone do this: If you're not happy working in your current team, we can move you.move sb to sth After only six months at the firm, he was moved to sales.move to/from/into sth She wants to move into corporate finance.
[I] to take action or make progress: One financial analyst said the court decision could prompt the company to move more quickly on the issue.move ahead/forward/away from sth The state is moving ahead with legislation reforms for small businesses.
[I or T] COMMERCE if a product moves, or if a store, company, etc. moves it, it sells quickly: Our latest range of Internet TVs is really moving.
formal MEETINGS to officially suggest something during a meeting: move that I move that we adopt the resolution.

movenoun

uk   /muːv/ us  
[C] action that a person or organization takes in order to achieve something: a move to do sth Moves to block free access to music on the Internet have met with limited success.a move by sb/sth Economists said a move by Japan to cut interest rates in isolation would have little effect on currency levels.make a move (to do sth) Moves are being made to help future doctors make objective decisions.first/next/latest move Our next move will crucially depend on the latest figures for inflation.a bold/strategic/dramatic move Strategic moves announced with the interim results should strengthen the balance sheet and improve cash flow.a move comes/follows The company's move comes as part of a wider industry crackdown on insurance fraud.applaud/approve/condemn a move Investors are expected to applaud the move.
[S] the process of changing from one system, activity, etc. to another: a move to/into sth Environmentalists have welcomed the move to congestion charging.a move (away) from sth We have incorporated several new concepts in recent months, including a move from commission-only staff to a team bonus structure.
[C] the process of changing the place where you live or work, or trading in a new place: a move from/to/into a place The move into Italy is part of a wider international expansion.
(Definition of move from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“move” in Business English

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