Definition of “mute” - English Dictionary

“mute” in British English

See all translations

muteadjective

uk /mjuːt/ us /mjuːt/

silent or not speaking:

The president has remained mute about plans to curtail the number of immigrants.
I gazed at her in mute admiration.

old-fashioned offensive unable to speak:

a mute child

mutenoun [ C ]

uk /mjuːt/ us /mjuːt/

music a device for changing the sound of a musical instrument, usually making it quieter:

He was playing his trumpet with a mute.

also mute button a button on an electronic device that makes it silent:

I pressed the mute on my phone so she couldn't hear the people talking in the background.
He was watching TV with the mute button on.

old-fashioned offensive a person who is not able to speak

muteverb [ T ]

uk /mjuːt/ us /mjuːt/

If you mute a noise, you do something to make it less loud:

Heavy curtains muted the noise of the traffic.

music If you mute a musical instrument, you attach a device to it that changes its sound, usually making it quieter:

(Definition of “mute” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“mute” in American English

See all translations

muteadjective [ not gradable ]

us /mjut/

(of a person) completely unable or unwilling to speak, or (of a place, object, or activity) silent:

He stood mute before the judge.
The decay of Dawson City bore mute testimony to the end of the gold rush era.

(Definition of “mute” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)