odd Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “odd” - English Dictionary

Definition of "odd" - American English Dictionary

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oddadjective

 us   /ɑd/

odd adjective (STRANGE)

[-er/-est only] strange or ​unexpected: an odd ​person That’s odd – I ​thought I ​left my ​glasses on the ​table but they’re not here.

odd adjective (SEPARATED)

[not gradable] (of something that should be in a ​pair or set) separated from ​itspair or set: He’s got a ​wholedrawerfull of odd ​socks.

odd adjective (NUMBER)

[not gradable] (of ​numbers) not ​able to be ​dividedexactly by 2: Some ​examples of odd ​numbers are 1, 3, 5, and 7.

oddadverb [not gradable]

 us   /ɑd/

odd adverb [not gradable] (APPROXIMATELY)

used after a ​number, esp. a ​number that can be ​divided by 10, to show that the ​exactnumber is not ​known: He ​holds another 50-odd ​acres of ​land in ​reserve, ​providing plenty of ​room for ​expansion.
(Definition of odd from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "odd" - British English Dictionary

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oddadjective

uk   /ɒd/  us   /ɑːd/

odd adjective (STRANGE)

B2 strange or ​unexpected: Her ​father was an odd man. What an odd thing to say. The ​skirt and ​jacketlooked a little odd together. That's odd - I'm ​sure I put my ​keys in this ​drawer and ​yet they're not here. It's odd that no one's ​seen him. It must be odd to go back to ​yourhometown after forty ​years away.
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odd adjective (NOT OFTEN)

C2 [before noun] not ​happening often: She does the odd ​teaching job but nothing ​permanent. You get the odd ​person who's ​rude to you but they're ​generallyquitehelpful.
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odd adjective (NUMBERS)

(of ​numbers) not ​able to be ​dividedexactly by two: 3, 5, and 7 are all odd ​numbers. The ​houses on this ​side of the ​street all have odd ​numbers.
Opposite

odd adjective (SEPARATED)

[before noun] (of something that should be in a ​pair or set) ​separated from ​itspair or set: He's got a ​wholedrawerfull of odd ​socks. I'd got a few odd (= I had ​various)balls of ​woolleft over.

-oddsuffix

uk   /-ɒd/  us   /-ɑːd/ informal
used after a ​number, ​especially a ​number that can be ​divided by ten, to show that the ​exactnumber is not ​known: I'd say Robert's about 40-odd - ​maybe 45.
(Definition of odd from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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