odd Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of “odd” - English Dictionary

"odd" in American English

See all translations

oddadjective

us   /ɑd/
  • odd adjective (STRANGE)

[-er/-est only] strange or unexpected: an odd person That’s odd – I thought I left my glasses on the table but they’re not here.
  • odd adjective (SEPARATED)

[not gradable] (of something that should be in a pair or set) separated from its pair or set: He’s got a whole drawer full of odd socks.
  • odd adjective (NUMBER)

[not gradable] (of numbers) not able to be divided exactly by 2: Some examples of odd numbers are 1, 3, 5, and 7.

oddadverb [not gradable]

us   /ɑd/
used after a number, esp. a number that can be divided by 10, to show that the exact number is not known: He holds another 50-odd acres of land in reserve, providing plenty of room for expansion.
(Definition of odd from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"odd" in British English

See all translations

oddadjective

uk   /ɒd/ us   /ɑːd/
  • odd adjective (STRANGE)

B2 strange or unexpected: Her father was an odd man. What an odd thing to say. The skirt and jacket looked a little odd together. That's odd - I'm sure I put my keys in this drawer and yet they're not here. It's odd that no one's seen him. It must be odd to go back to your home town after forty years away.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • odd adjective (NOT OFTEN)

C2 [before noun] not happening often: She does the odd teaching job but nothing permanent. You get the odd person who's rude to you but they're generally quite helpful.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • odd adjective (SEPARATED)

[before noun] (of something that should be in a pair or set) separated from its pair or set: He's got a whole drawer full of odd socks. I'd got a few odd (= I had various) balls of wool left over.

-oddsuffix

uk   / -ɒd/ us   / -ɑːd/ informal
(Definition of odd from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of odd?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Watching the detectorists
Watching the detectorists
by ,
May 31, 2016
by Colin McIntosh You could be forgiven for thinking that old-fashioned hobbies that don’t involve computers have fallen out of favour. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, the internet has made it easier for people with specialist hobbies from different corners of the world to come together to support one another

Read More 

Word of the Day

biodegrade

to decay naturally and in a way that is not harmful

Word of the Day

decision fatigue noun
decision fatigue noun
May 30, 2016
a decreased ability to make decisions as a result of having too many decisions to make Our brains have a finite number of decisions they can make before they get depleted and become less discerning – so this is called decision fatigue.

Read More