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Definition of “OK” - English Dictionary

"OK" in American English

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OKexclamation, adjective [not gradable]

(also okay)  us   /ˈoʊˈkeɪ, ˌoʊˈkeɪ, ˈoʊˌkeɪ/
agreed or ​acceptable; all ​right : Is it OK if I ​bring a ​friend to the ​party? "Will you ​lend me ten ​bucks?" "OK."
OK
verb [T] (singular OK's, present participle OK'ing or okaying, past tense and past participle OK'd or okayed) (also okay)  us   /ˈoʊˈkeɪ, ˌoʊˈkeɪ, ˈoʊˌkeɪ/
Did the ​boss OK ​yourproposal?

OKadjective, adverb

(also okay)  us   /ˈoʊˈkeɪ, ˌoʊˈkeɪ, ˈoʊˌkeɪ/
  • OK adjective, adverb (SATISFACTORY)

in a ​satisfactorystate or of a ​satisfactoryquality; all ​right : Are you OK? You ​lookpale. I ​hope you got ​home OK.
OK is used to ​mean not ​bad but also not very good: Her ​voice is OK, but it’s nothing ​special.

OKnoun [C]

(also okay)  us   /ˈoʊˈkeɪ, ˌoʊˈkeɪ, ˈoʊˌkeɪ/
  • OK noun [C] (AGREED)

agreement about or ​permission to do something: We’ll ​startbuilding as ​soon as we get the OK from the ​owner.

OKexclamation

(also okay)  us   /ˈoʊˈkeɪ, ˌoʊˈkeɪ, ˈoʊˌkeɪ/ infml
  • OK exclamation (EXPRESSION)

used as a way of ​showing that you are going to take ​action or ​start doing or saying something new: OK, let’s go.
(Definition of OK from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"OK" in British English

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OKexclamation

(also okay) uk   /ˌəʊˈkeɪ/  us   /ˌoʊˈkeɪ/
  • OK exclamation (AGREEING)

A1 used to show that you ​agree with something or ​agree to do something: "I'll ​pay you back ​tomorrow." "OK, no ​problem." "Could you ​pick me up from ​work?" "OK, what ​time?" I ​mean, OK (= I ​accept that), I wasn't ​exactlypolite to him, but I don't ​think I was that ​rude!
  • OK exclamation (ACTION)

A2 informal used as a way of ​showing that you are going to take ​action or ​start something new: Okay, let's go. Okay then, if you're ​ready we'll ​start.

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  • Okay, let's get going!
  • OK, is everyone ​ready?
  • Okay, today I'm going to ​tell you a ​bit about Picasso.
  • OK, now that everyone's here, we'll ​sit down.
  • OK, Stephanie, could you ​tell us what you've been doing this ​week?

OKadjective

(also okay) uk   /ˌəʊˈkeɪ/  us   /ˌoʊˈkeɪ/ informal
  • OK adjective (AGREED)

A2 agreed or ​acceptable: Is it okay if I ​bring a ​friend to the ​party? If it's okay by/with you, I'll come over ​tomorrowinstead.

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  • OK adjective (ACCEPTABLE)

A1 in a ​satisfactorystate or of a ​satisfactoryquality: How's Paula? Is she okay after her ​fallyesterday? Are you OK? You ​look very ​pale. "Is everything OK with you?" "Yes, ​fine." I'll just ​check that the car's okay - that ​noise from the ​engine doesn't ​sound good!
Synonym
A2 not ​bad but ​certainly not good: "Did you have a good ​dinner out last ​night?" "It was okay - I've ​definitely had ​better." Her ​voice is OK, but it's nothing ​special.

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OKadverb

(also okay) uk   /ˌəʊˈkeɪ/  us   /ˌoʊˈkeɪ/ informal

OKverb [T]

(present tense OK's, present participle OK'ing, past tense and past participle OK'd) (also okay (present tense okays, present participle okaying, past tense and past participle okayed)) uk   /ˌəʊˈkeɪ/  us   /ˌoʊˈkeɪ/ informal
to ​agree to something: Have the ​committee OK'd ​yourproposal?

OKnoun

uk   /ˌəʊˈkeɪ/  us   /ˌoʊˈkeɪ/
(Definition of OK from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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