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Definition of “originate” - English Dictionary

"originate" in American English

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originateverb [I]

 us   /əˈrɪdʒ·əˌneɪt/
to come from or begin in a particular place or situation: Jazz originated in the US and is now popular throughout the world.
(Definition of originate from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"originate" in British English

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originateverb

uk   /əˈrɪdʒ.ən.eɪt/  us   /əˈrɪdʒ.ən.eɪt/
(Definition of originate from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"originate" in Business English

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originateverb

uk   us   /əˈrɪdʒəneɪt/
[I] to come from a particular place, time, situation, etc.: originate in Although the technology originated in the UK, it has been developed in the US.originate at This flight originated at Los Angeles airport and is continuing to Boston and then Madrid.originate from sb/sth They are studying complaints believed to have originated from retailers.
[T] to start something or cause it to happen: We plan to improve our marketing program using ideas originated by our customers.
[T] FINANCE to arrange a new loan or investment : A mortgage broker matches borrowers with lenders but does not originate or service mortgages.
(Definition of originate from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “originate”
in Arabic يَنشأ…
in Korean -에서 기원하다…
in Portuguese ter origem, ser originário…
in Catalan originar-se…
in Japanese ~から始まる…
in Chinese (Simplified) 起源,发源,发端, 产生, 最早开始…
in Chinese (Traditional) 起源,發源,發端, 產生, 最早開始…
in Italian avere origine…
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“originate” in Business English

A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
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May 04, 2016
by Kate Woodford We can’t always focus on the positive! This week, we’re looking at the language that is used to refer to arguing and arguments, and the differences in meaning between the various words and phrases. There are several words that suggest that people are arguing about something that is not important. (As you might

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