out Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “out” - English Dictionary

Definition of "out" - American English Dictionary

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outpreposition, adverb [not gradable]

 us   /ɑʊt/

out preposition, adverb [not gradable] (FROM INSIDE)

from within to a ​place or ​position that is not inside a ​building or not ​enclosed or ​contained: I’m going out for a ​walk. He ​leaned out the ​window and ​waved. Our ​officelooks out on a ​publicpark.

out preposition, adverb [not gradable] (AWAY)

away or ​absent from ​yourhome or ​place of ​work: I’ll be out ​tomorrow. Leo went out to ​lunch . We often ​eat out (= at ​restaurants). Billasked me out (= to go ​somewhereenjoyable together). If something is out, it is not where it is usually ​kept or ​belongs: I ​checked at the ​library and that ​book is out.

out preposition, adverb [not gradable] (FROM A PLACE)

away from a ​place or ​startingpoint, or ​far away: They moved out to the ​country. Have you ​sent out the ​invitationsyet?

outadverb [not gradable]

 us   /ɑʊt/

out adverb [not gradable] (BEYOND)

in the ​area beyond a ​building or ​room, or outdoors (= not in a ​building): It’s ​cold out today. They ​camped out. Keep out (= Do not ​enter).

out adverb [not gradable] (REMOVED)

to the ​point where something is ​removed or ​disappears: The ​stain on my ​tie won’t come out. Cross out the second ​number.

out adverb [not gradable] (COMPLETELY)

completely, or as much as ​possible: She ​stretched out on the ​bed. We were ​tired out.

out adverb [not gradable] (ALOUD)

aloud, so other ​people can ​hear: Her ​mother called out to us.

outadjective, adverb [not gradable]

 us   /ɑʊt/

out adjective, adverb [not gradable] (AVAILABLE)

(esp. of a ​book, ​movie, or ​recording) ​available to the ​public: Is his new ​novel out ​yet?

out adjective, adverb [not gradable] (MADE KNOWN)

made ​known to the ​public: The secret’s out about her ​retirement.

out adjective, adverb [not gradable] (SEEN)

able to be ​seen: It ​stopped raining and the ​sun came out.

out adjective, adverb [not gradable] (NOT OPERATING)

no ​longeroperating or ​working: The ​electricity went out during the ​storm. If something that ​burns is out, it is no ​longerburning: Be ​sure the ​fire is out.

out adjective, adverb [not gradable] (NOT AWARE)

unconscious, ​sleeping, or not ​aware: He ​passed out (= ​becameunconscious). Matt was so ​tired, he’s out ​cold (= in a ​deepsleep).

out adjective, adverb [not gradable] (COMPLETELY USED)

(coming) into a ​condition in which something has been used and no more of it is ​left: Our ​moneyran out. His ​luck was ​running out. Renew ​yourmembership before the ​month is out.

out adjective, adverb [not gradable] (NOT FASHIONABLE)

infml not ​fashionable or ​popular: Long ​hair is out.

outadjective [not gradable]

 us   /ɑʊt/

out adjective [not gradable] (NOT ACCEPTABLE)

not ​acceptable, not ​possible, or not ​allowed: Thursday is out so let’s ​meetFriday.

out adjective [not gradable] (INTENDING)

infml intending to do or get something: He’s just out for a good ​time. The ​mayor is out to get some ​publicity.

out adjective [not gradable] (BASEBALL)

failing or having ​failed to ​reach a base : He was out on a ​closeplay at second ​base.

outnoun

 us   /ɑʊt/

out noun (EXCUSE)

[C usually sing] infml an ​excuse or ​reason for ​avoiding an ​unpleasantsituation: The ​kids need to get ​home, so we have an out if we need it.
(Definition of out from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "out" - British English Dictionary

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outadverb, preposition

uk   us   /aʊt/

out adverb, preposition (AWAY FROM INSIDE)

B1 used to show ​movement away from the inside of a ​place or ​container: She ​opened the ​window and ​stuck her ​head out. The ​bagbroke and the ​applesfell out. I ​jumped out ofbed and ​randownstairs. He ​leaned out the ​window. He ​opened the ​drawer and took out a ​pair of ​socks. Get out! Out you go! (= Go out!) My ​secretary will see you out (= go with you to the ​door). Turn the ​trousers inside out (= put the inside on the ​outside).
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out adverb, preposition (OUTSIDE)

outside a ​building or ​room: If you ​wait out here, we will ​call you when the ​doctor is ​ready. Danger! Keep out! (= Do not ​enter!) It's ​bitterlycold out, today.
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out adverb, preposition (ABSENT)

A2 absent for a ​shorttime from the ​place where you ​live or ​work: I came around to ​see you this ​morning, but you were out. Someone called while you were out.A2 used to refer to a ​period of ​time when someone goes away from ​home for a ​socialactivity: I can't go out ​tonight - I have ​work to do. Do you ​want to ​eat out (= ​eat in a ​restaurant)tonight? He ​asked me out (= ​asked me to go with him) to the ​cinema next ​week. used to refer to a ​time when someone is away from the ​mainoffice in ​order to do a ​particularjob: The ​thieves were ​spotted by a ​postman out on his ​rounds (= as he was ​delivering the ​post). The ​police were out in ​force (= there were a lot of ​police) at the ​demonstration. In a ​library, if a ​book is out, it has been ​borrowed by someone: Both ​copies of "Wuthering Heights" were out.
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out adverb, preposition (DISAPPEAR)

B1 to the ​point where something is ​removed or ​disappears: The ​stain won't come out. Cross out any words that are not on the ​list. Never use ​water to put out ​fires in ​electricalequipment. Our ​time/​money/​patience ran out.out of B2 used to say that no more of something is ​available: We're ​nearly out of ​petrol. I'm running out of ​patience/​time/​money.
See also
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out adverb, preposition (DEFEATED)

(in ​sport) no ​longerable to ​play because ​yourturn is over: Two of the ​bestplayers on the ​team were out after ten ​minutes. New Zealand were all out for 246 (= the ​teamfinished with a ​score of 246). (in ​politics) no ​longerable to ​govern because you have ​lost an ​election: The Social Democrats were ​voted out after 15 ​years in ​power.
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out adverb, preposition (GIVE)

to many ​people: The ​teacher gave out ​testbooks to all the ​students. Greenpeace sent a ​letter out to all ​itssupporters.
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out adverb, preposition (MOVE AWAY)

spreading out from a ​centralpoint over a ​widerarea: The ​policesearchparty spread out ​across the ​fields.
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out adverb, preposition (AVAILABLE)

B1 When a ​book, ​magazine, ​film, or ​musicalrecording is out, it is ​available to the ​public: Is her new ​book out ​yet? The new ​movie comes out in ​August.
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out adverb, preposition (APPEAR)

B1 able to be ​seen: The ​stars are out ​tonight. The ​rainstopped and the ​sun came out (= ​appeared). In ​spring all the ​flowers came out (= ​theirpetalsopened).
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out adverb, preposition (VERY)

used to make the ​meaning of a word ​stronger: We ​walked all ​day and were ​tired out (= very ​tired) by the ​time we got ​home. It's up to you to sort this out (= ​deal with it ​completely).
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out adverb, preposition (LOUD)

used with ​verbsdescribingsounds to ​emphasize the ​loudness of the ​sound: He cried out in ​pain as he ​hit his ​head. Charlie Chaplin ​films always make me laugh out loud.
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out adverb, preposition (FAR AWAY)

C2 a ​longdistance away from ​land, a ​town, or ​your own ​country: The ​fishingboats were out at ​sea for three ​days. They ​live out in the ​country, ​miles from ​anywhere. He ​lived out in Zambia for seven ​years.mainly US The weather's ​better out west (= a ​longdistance away in the ​west of the ​country).
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out adverb, preposition (LIGHT/FIRE)

B2 If a ​light or ​fire is out, it is no ​longershining or ​burning: When we got ​home, all the ​lights were out. Is that ​firecompletely out?

out adverb, preposition (COAST)

away from the ​coast or ​beach: Is the ​tide coming in or going out? You can only ​see the ​beach when the tide is out.
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out adverb, preposition (MADE PUBLIC)

(of ​information) no ​longerkeptsecret: You can't ​hideyourgambling any ​longer - the secret's out. If a ​gayperson comes out, they ​tellpeople that they are ​gay, and do not ​keep it a ​secret: She came out three ​years ago. He hasn't come out to his ​familyyet.
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out adverb, preposition (SPORT)

(of a ​ball in a ​sport such as ​tennis) ​landingoutside one of the ​lines that ​mark the ​area where the ​game is ​played: He ​thought the ​ball had ​bounced on the ​line, but the ​umpire said it was out.
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out adverb, preposition (UNCONSCIOUS)

unconscious or ​sleeping: He passes out (= ​losesconsciousness) at the ​sight of ​blood. I was ​hit on the ​head, and I must have been out cold (= ​completelyunconscious) for about ten ​minutes.
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out adverb, preposition (NOT ACCURATE)

C1 informal not ​accurate: Our ​estimates were only out by a few ​dollars. You were an ​inch out in ​yourmeasurements. Those ​salesfigures were way out (= ​completelywrong).US I'm out $25 on this ​trip (= it ​cost me $25 more than ​expected).

out adverb, preposition (EXISTING)

UK informal (used with superlatives) ​available or in ​existence: This is the ​bestautomaticcamera out. I ​think he's the ​greatestfootballplayer out.

out adverb, preposition (FINISHED)

used to show that a ​period of ​time is ​finished: I ​think I can ​finish this ​project before the month's out.

out adverb, preposition (NOT ACCEPTABLE)

informal not ​acceptable or not ​possible: Smoking is ​definitely out among my ​friends. The ​option of taking on more ​staff is out for the ​moment.

out adverb, preposition (NOT FASHIONABLE)

informal no ​longerfashionable or ​popular: Every ​month the ​magazinelists what's out and what's in (= ​fashionable). Trousers like that went out (= ​stopped being ​fashionable) in the 70s.

out adverb, preposition (INTEND)

out for sth/to do sth informal doing something, or ​intending to do something, for an ​unpleasantreason or only because it is good for you and not ​others: She doesn't usually ​help the ​charity - she's only out for the ​publicity. [+ to infinitive] He's always been out tocausetrouble between us.
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outverb [T often passive]

uk   us   /aʊt/
to ​publish the ​fact that a ​famousperson is ​gay, ​especially when that ​person does not ​want it to be ​known: Hardly a ​week went by without someone ​famous being outed.

outnoun

uk   us   /aʊt/
[C usually singular] informal an ​excuse or ​reason for ​avoiding an ​unpleasantsituation: We must ​arrange the ​negotiations so we have an out if we need it.on the outs US informal People who are on the outs have ​argued and are not now ​friendly with each other: Lizzie and Tyler are on the outs again.

out-prefix

uk   us   /aʊt-/

out prefix (NOT CENTRAL)

used to ​add the ​meaning "not ​central" to ​nouns and ​adjectives: the outskirts of ​town (= the ​areas that ​form the ​edge of the ​town)

out prefix (FURTHER)

used to ​add the ​meaning "going ​further" or "being ​better than" to ​verbs: She doesn't ​drink or ​smoke and I'm ​sure she'll ​outlive (= ​livelonger than) us all.

out prefix (AWAY FROM)

used to ​add the ​meaning "out of" or "away from" to ​nouns and ​adjectives: She ​turned away from ​theiroutstretchedhands (= ​handsheld out).
(Definition of out from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "out" - Business English Dictionary

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outadverb

uk   us   /aʊt/
WORKPLACE away from the ​mainoffice, etc. in ​order to do a particular ​job: She is out on a ​servicecall, but will be back in about an hour.
WORKPLACE absent from the ​place where you ​work: He is out of the ​officeright now. I will be out for the rest of the morning. He has been out ​sick all week.
available for the ​public to ​buy: A new ​version of this ​phone has just come out.
not ​working: The ​power has been out for two ​hours.
not ​accurate: Our ​estimates were only out by a few ​dollars. Those ​salesfigures were way out.
(also out on strike) HR, WORKPLACE taking ​part in a strike (= ​refusing to ​work): The ​assemblyworkers have been out for a month. Union ​membersvoted unanimously to go out on ​strike.
out of action not able to be used: The ​elevators were out of ​action and we had to ​walk up to his ​office.
out of sth if you are out of something, you do not have it: We're completely out of ​toner for the ​printer. from a particular ​group: Four out of five ​broadbandusers don't know how fast their ​connections are.
out of the box if something can be used out of the ​box, it can be used immediately, without a lot of ​effort being needed to prepare it: These ​solutionsworkstraight out of the ​box. an out-of-the-box ​trainingprogram
(Definition of out from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“out” in Business English

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