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Definition of “package” - English Dictionary

"package" in American English

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packagenoun [C]

 us   /ˈpæk·ɪdʒ/
a ​box or ​container in which something is put, esp. to be ​sent or ​sold, or a ​group of ​objectswrapped together: a package of ​frozenspinach She went to the ​postoffice to ​mail a package. a five-night ​ski package
A package is also a ​group of ​objects, ​plans, or ​arrangements that are ​related and ​offered as a ​unit: a ​retirement package

packageverb [T]

 us   /ˈpæk·ɪdʒ/
to put something in a ​box or ​container, or to ​wrap things together, esp. to be ​sold: The ​book and CD are packaged together.
To package someone or something is also to ​represent it in a way to make it ​seemattractive: You have an ​idea, but how do you package it?
(Definition of package from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"package" in British English

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packagenoun [C]

uk   /ˈpæk.ɪdʒ/  us   /ˈpæk.ɪdʒ/
  • package noun [C] (PAPER OBJECT)

B2 (UK also parcel) an ​object or set of ​objectswrapped in ​paper, usually in ​order to be ​sent by ​post: The ​courier has just ​delivered a package for you. The package was ​wrapped in ​plainbrownpaper.
US (UK packet) a ​smallpaper or ​plasticcontainer in which a ​number of ​smallobjects are ​sold: a package ofcookies

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • package noun [C] (OFFERED TOGETHER)

B2 a ​relatedgroup of things when they are ​offered together as a ​singleunit: The ​computer comes with a software package. The aid package for the earthquake-hit ​area will ​includeemergencyfood and ​medicalsupplies.
the ​pay and other ​rewards that a ​companymanagerreceives: He will ​receive a compensation package ​worth $15 million over three ​years. a ​total pay package ​valued at $59.5 million
  • package noun [C] (BODY PART)

offensive (UK also packet) a man's ​sexorgans

packageverb [T]

uk   /ˈpæk.ɪdʒ/  us   /ˈpæk.ɪdʒ/
to put ​goods into ​boxes or ​containers to be ​sold: These ​organicolives are packaged inrecycledglasscontainers.
to ​sell several things together as a ​singleproduct: The ​program comes packaged with some ​games.
to show someone or something in a ​particular, usually ​attractive, way: As a ​youngfilmstar, she was packaged as a ​sexsymbol.
(Definition of package from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"package" in Business English

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packagenoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈpækɪdʒ/
(UK also parcel) COMMUNICATIONS an ​object or ​collection of ​objectswrapped in ​paper or other similar ​material and ​sent by ​mail, etc.: She's gone to ​collect a package from the post-room. postagerates for ​letters and packages This ​serviceenables you to ​track your package ​online.
US (UK packet) COMMERCE a ​smallcontainer in which ​objects are ​sold: a package of ​cookies/candy
HR, WORKPLACE the ​pay and other ​advantages that a ​companymanager receives: The salary package offered for this ​position is a very tempting one. She was ​offered an early-retirement package.
COMMERCE a ​collection of ​products or ​services that are ​supplied to the ​customer as a set: Our ​aim is to ​offer a comprehensive ​care package for the ​client. The ​hotel enjoys an excellent ​reputation for the ​quality of its wedding packages, which are also very ​flexible.
IT a ​collection of ​computerprograms that are ​supplied to the ​customer as a set : The ​companyproducesaccountancy software packages for ​smallbusinesses. Many word-processing packages ​include useful ​extras such as a spelling ​checker, thesaurus, and ​mailinglistmanagement.
informal →  package holiday

packageverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈpækɪdʒ/
COMMERCE to ​wrapgoods or put them into ​containers to be ​sold or ​sent somewhere: All ​orders received before 3pm are packaged and ​shipped the same day. Small ​items have to be ​individually packaged to ensure ​safedelivery to the ​customer.
COMMERCE to put different ​goods and ​services together to ​sell as a set: package sth with sth The album is packaged with an informative booklet.
informal MARKETING to describe or show someone or something in a way that ​aims to make them seem more attractive: The facts are neatly packaged by our PR ​team before they go out to the ​public.package yourself as sth They ​spent millions on packaging themselves as a ​responsible, caring ​company.package yourself for sth There are ​books that ​advise you on how to package yourself for a ​topjob.
FINANCE, STOCK MARKET to ​buyloans from other ​financialorganizations and ​sell them as ​bonds. Investors receive their ​profits from the ​regularpayments made towards the ​originalloans: Citibank took a ​major role in the ​business of packaging ​loan receivables and ​selling them as securities.
BANKING, FINANCE to ​help a ​businessapply for a ​loan by using ​specialmarketknowledge to ​provide the ​rightinformation and to ​contact the lenders that are most likely to ​provide the ​money: Costs for their packaging ​servicevary depending on the complexity of the ​loan being packaged.
(Definition of package from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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