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Definition of “parallel” - English Dictionary

"parallel" in American English

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paralleladjective

 us   /ˈpær·əˌlel, -ləl/
  • parallel adjective (POSITION)

geometry [not gradable] (of two or more ​straightlines) being the same ​distanceapart along all ​theirlength: The ​wood was ​marked with parallel ​darkbands.
  • parallel adjective (SIMILARITY)

similar or ​matching: Parallel ​experiments are being ​conducted in Europe and the ​UnitedStates.
parallel
adverb [not gradable]  us   /ˈpær·əˌlel, -ləl/
Maple ​Streetruns parallel to ​StateStreet.
parallel
verb [T]  us   /ˈpær·əˌlel, -ləl/
The ​highway parallels the ​river for about 20 ​miles.

parallelnoun [C]

 us   /ˈpær·əˌlel, -ləl/
  • parallel noun [C] (SIMILARITY)

something very ​similar to something ​else, or a ​similarity between two things: There’s an ​incredible parallel between the ​talkingblues of 50 ​years ago and today’s ​rapmusic. The ​blackexperience in ​America has been without parallel in the ​experience of other ​peoples.
  • parallel noun [C] (POSITION)

earth science one of the ​imaginarylatitudelines around the ​earth that are parallel to the ​equator: the 40th parallel
parallel
verb [T]  us   /ˈpær·əˌlel, -ləl/
Her ​account of the ​incidentclosely parallels what ​others have ​reported.
(Definition of parallel from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"parallel" in British English

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paralleladjective

uk   /ˈpær.ə.lel/  us   /ˈper.ə.lel/
  • parallel adjective (POSITION)

If two or more ​lines, ​streets, etc. are parallel, the ​distance between them is the same all along ​theirlength: Draw a ​pair of parallel ​lines. Hills Road is parallel to Mill Road.

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  • parallel adjective (SIMILAR)

C2 used to ​describe an ​event or ​situation that ​happens at the same ​time as and/or is ​similar to another one: a parallel ​example Parallel ​experiments are being ​conducted in Rome, Paris and London.
  • parallel adjective (COMPUTING)

specialized computing sending through several bits (= ​units) of ​information at a ​time using a ​link with several channels (= ​wires or ​connections): parallel communication
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parallelnoun

uk   /ˈpær.ə.lel/  us   /ˈper.ə.lel/
  • parallel noun (SIMILARITY)

C2 [C] something very ​similar to something ​else, or a ​similarity between two things: I'm ​trying to ​see if there are any ​obvious parallels between the two ​cases. It would be ​easy to draw (= make) a parallel between the city's ​history and that of ​itstheatres.
have no parallel (also be without parallel)
If something has no parallel or is without parallel, there is nothing ​similar to it or of the same high ​quality as it: These ​beautifulAfricanchurches have no parallel in ​Europe.

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  • parallel noun (POSITION)

parallel (line)
a ​line that is always at the same ​distance from another ​line
one of a ​number of ​imaginarylines around the ​earth always at the same ​distance from the equator: Cambridge ​lies near the 52nd parallel.
in parallel specialized
If two or more ​parts of an ​electricalsystem are in parallel, they are ​arranged in a way that ​means they both ​receive the same ​amount of ​electricity.
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parallelverb [T]

uk   /ˈpær.ə.lel/  us   /ˈper.ə.lel/

paralleladverb

uk   /ˈpær.ə.lel/  us   /ˈper.ə.lel/
in a ​position that is always the same ​distance from something ​else: It's a ​quietstreet running (= ​positioned) parallel to the ​mainroad.
(Definition of parallel from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"parallel" in Business English

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paralleladjective

uk   us   /ˈpærəlel/
ECONOMICS, COMMERCE used to describe ​products that are ​bought in one country in an ​unofficial way and then ​sold more ​cheaply than usual in a different country: Brandowners are not entirely ​opposed to parallel ​trade. The ​government has ​adopted a ​labellingpolicy which ​requiresdistributors of parallel ​goods to ​label the ​origins of the ​goods.
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IT involving two or more ​computerprocesseshappening at one ​time: Groups of ​workstationsact in parallel.
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(Definition of parallel from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“parallel” in Business English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
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April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

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a small amount of something that shows you what the rest is or should be like

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