path Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of “path” - English Dictionary

"path" in American English

See all translations

pathnoun [C]

 us   /pæθ/
a way or ​track made by or for ​peoplewalking on the ​ground, or a ​line along which something moves: a ​bike path The ​forestfireburned everything in ​its path.
A path is also a set of ​actions that ​lead to a ​result or ​goal: Ashe pioneered the path of ​blacktennisplayers to the ​top of the ​game.
physics The path of an ​electron is the ​space it ​travels in around the ​center of an ​atom.
(Definition of path from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"path" in British English

See all translations

pathnoun [C]

uk   /pɑːθ/  us   /pæθ/
  • path noun [C] (TRACK)

A2 a ​route or ​track between one ​place and another, or the ​direction in which something is ​moving: a ​garden path a ​concrete path a well-trodden path This is the path to the ​cliffs. It will be several ​days before ​snowploughs clear a path (through) to the ​village. They followed the path until they came to a ​gate. A ​fiercefire is still ​raging through the ​forest, ​burning everything in ​its path (= as it ​movesforward). The Weather Service ​issueswarnings to ​people in the path of a ​hurricane (= in the ​area in which it is ​moving). The ​chargedparticlesmove in ​spiral paths.figurative His path through ​life was never ​easy.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • path noun [C] (ACTIONS)

B2 a set of ​actions, ​especiallyones that ​lead to a ​goal or ​result: The path tosuccess is ​fraught with difficulties.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

(Definition of path from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of path?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
by ,
April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

Read More 

Word of the Day

cracker

a thin, flat, hard biscuit, especially one eaten with cheese

Word of the Day

bio-banding noun
bio-banding noun
April 25, 2016
in sport, grouping children according to their physical maturity rather than their age ‘When we’re grouping children for sports, we do it by age groups, but the problem is that, within those age groups, we get huge variations in biological age,’ said Dr Sean Cumming, senior lecturer at the University of Bath’s department for

Read More