Definition of “peer” - English Dictionary

“peer” in English

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peerverb [ I usually + adv/prep ]

uk /pɪər/ us /pɪr/

C2 to look carefully or with difficulty:

When no one answered the door, she peered through the window to see if anyone was there.
The driver was peering into the distance trying to read the road sign.

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peernoun [ C ]

uk /pɪər/ us /pɪr/

peer noun [ C ] (EQUAL)

C1 a person who is the same age or has the same social position or the same abilities as other people in a group:

Do you think it's true that teenage girls are less self-confident than their male peers?
He wasn't a great scholar, but as a teacher he had few peers (= not as many people had the same ability as him).

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peer noun [ C ] (HIGH RANK)

in the UK, a person who has a high social position and any of a range of titles, including baron, earl, and duke, or a life peer:

a hereditary peer
a Conservative peer

(Definition of “peer” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“peer” in American English

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peer verb [ I always + adv/prep ] (LOOK)

to look carefully or with difficulty:

The judge peered over his glasses at the jury.

peernoun [ C ]

us /pɪər/

peer noun [ C ] (EQUAL)

a person of the same age, the same social position, or having the same abilities as other people in a group:

Getting help from a peer is easier than asking a teacher.

(Definition of “peer” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

“peer” in Business English

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peernoun [ C ]

uk /pɪər/ us

a company in the same industry as other companies:

Dixons is doing better than its peers.

a person of a similar age, position, abilities, etc. as others in a group:

According to research, high school dropouts earn $260,000 less in a lifetime than their degree-earning peers.

See also

(Definition of “peer” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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peer

Is it of concern for instance that the peer group review mechanism is somehow now being increasingly institutionalised and separated off as a kind of separate secretariat?
Almost all the harmful tax measures identified following a peer review process have been or are in the process of being removed.
In the case of the peer review, for example, only ten out of twenty-five countries have so far submitted their implementation reports!
We do not do justice to ourselves with emotive, hysterical or populist responses to the latest peer-reviewed scientific developments, and we do not do justice to our democratic mandate.
Once the individual proposals have been received in response to the calls, they are evaluated by expert peer reviews using a standard set of evaluation criteria.
Mutual monitoring, the famous peer pressure which we now want to transfer to the real economy, was not the only factor.
After all, young people are susceptible to peer pressure and, in addition, the harmful effects on health are greater in this group.
Management of the deep sea must also be based on the very best peer-reviewed science, which will include effective by-catch and data-collection programmes.
However, although we have a study, because we said that we needed a study in order to proceed, we now want to subject this study to peer review.
Redefining the objectives will be of little use if the toolkit still consists of subsidiarity, open coordination, peer pressure and moral persuasion, particularly during a slump.