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Definition of “person” - English Dictionary

"person" in American English

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personnoun [C]

 us   /ˈpɜr·sən/ (plural people  /ˈpi·pəl/ or persons)
a man, woman, or ​child: Neil Armstrong was the first person to set ​foot on the ​moon. The ​auditorium can ​seat about 500 people. The ​planecrashed just after takeoff, ​killing all 29 persons ​aboard.
Person is also used when ​describing someone’s ​character or ​personality: I don’t ​think of him as a ​book person (= someone who ​likesbooks). She’s ​nice enough as a person, but she’s not ​right for the ​job.
Note: In formal writing, the plural "persons" is sometimes preferred over "people," but "persons" is also used in news reports – At least 30 persons are ​dead or ​missing – and in the phrase "person or persons" when the number of people is not known – We ​expect to ​catch the person or persons ​responsible.
Idioms
(Definition of person from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"person" in British English

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personnoun [C]

uk   /ˈpɜː.sən/  us   /ˈpɝː.sən/ (plural people or formal persons)
  • person noun [C] (HUMAN)

A1 a man, woman, or ​child: Who was the first person to ​swim the ​English Channel? A ​meal at the ​restaurantcosts about $70 for two people.formal Four persons have been ​charged with the ​murder.
used when ​describing someone's ​character: She's an ​extremelykind person. He's ​nice enough as a person, but he's not the ​right man for this ​job.informal I don't ​think of him as a ​book person (= a person who ​likesbooks).
in person
B2 If you do something or go ​somewhere in person, you do it or go there yourself: If you can't be there in person, the next ​best thing is ​watching it on TV.

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  • person noun [C] (GRAMMAR)

specialized language, language used in ​grammar to ​describe the ​verbs and pronouns that refer to the different people in a ​conversation. The first person ("I" or "we") refers to the person ​speaking, the second person ("you") refers to the person being ​spoken to and the third person ("he", "she", "it", or "they") refers to another person or thing being ​spoken about or ​described: The ​novel is written in the first person, so that the ​author and ​narratorseem to be the same. "Am" is the first person ​singular of the ​verb "to be".

-personsuffix

uk   / -pɜː.sən/  us   / -pɝː.sən/
used to ​combine with ​nouns to ​form new ​nouns referring to the ​particularjob or ​duty that someone has. It is often used ​instead of -man or -woman to ​avoid making an ​unnecessarystatement about the ​sex of the ​particularperson: spokesperson chairperson businesspeople
(Definition of person from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"person" in Business English

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personnoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈpɜːsən/ (persons)
LAW →  legal person
(Definition of person from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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