pine Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Definition of “pine” - English Dictionary

"pine" in American English

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pinenoun [C/U]

 us   /pɑɪn/
an ​evergreentree that has ​thinleaves like ​needles and that ​grows in ​coolnorthernregions, or the ​wood of these ​trees

pineverb [I always + adv/prep]

 us   /pɑɪn/
to ​stronglydesire esp. something that is ​difficult or ​impossible to ​obtain: Bradley pined for his ​wife, who was ​far away.
(Definition of pine from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"pine" in British English

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pinenoun

uk   us   /paɪn/
B2 [C or U] (also pine tree) an evergreentree (= one that never ​losesitsleaves) that ​grows in ​coolerareas of the ​world: a ​plantation of pines a pine ​forest [U] the ​wood of pine ​trees, usually ​pale in ​colour: pine ​furniture Pine is a ​softwood.

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piny
adjective (also piney) uk   us   /ˈpaɪ.ni/

pineverb [I]

uk   us   /paɪn/
(Definition of pine from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “pine”
in Korean 소나무…
in Arabic شَجرة الصَنَوْبَر…
in Malaysian pokok pain, kayu pain…
in French pin, (de) pin…
in Russian сосна, сосновая древесина…
in Chinese (Traditional) 松樹, 松木…
in Italian pino…
in Turkish çam ağacı, çam kerestesi…
in Polish sosna…
in Spanish pino…
in Vietnamese cây thông, gỗ thông…
in Portuguese pinheiro…
in Thai ต้นสน, ไม้สน…
in German die Kiefer, das Kiefernholz, Kiefern-……
in Catalan pi…
in Japanese 松…
in Chinese (Simplified) 松树, 松木…
in Indonesian tusam, pohon cemara, kayu tusam…
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