pledge Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of “pledge” - English Dictionary

Definition of "pledge" - American English Dictionary

See all translations

pledgenoun [C]

 us   /pledʒ/
a ​formalpromise, or something that is given as a ​sign that you will ​keep a ​promise: a pledge of ​friendship The ​telethonraised $150,000 in pledges for ​leukemiaresearch.
(Definition of pledge from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "pledge" - British English Dictionary

See all translations

pledgenoun [C]

uk   us   /pledʒ/
a ​serious or ​formalpromise, ​especially one to give ​money or to be a ​friend, or something that you give as a ​sign that you will ​keep a ​promise: [+ to infinitive] All the ​candidates have given/made pledges not toraisetaxes if they are ​elected. Thousands of ​people made pledges (= ​promised to give ​money) to the ​charitycampaign. I give you this ​ring as a pledge of my ​everlastinglove for you.
More examples

pledgeverb [T]

uk   us   /pledʒ/
to make a ​serious or ​formalpromise to give or do something: We are ​askingpeople to pledge ​their support for ​ourcampaign. If you ​join the ​armedforces, you have to pledge allegiance to ​yourcountry. So ​far, £50,000 has been pledged (= ​people have ​promised to ​pay this ​amount) in ​response to the ​appeal. [+ to infinitive] Both ​sides have pledged to end the ​fighting. I've been pledged tosecrecy.
More examples
(Definition of pledge from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "pledge" - Business English Dictionary

See all translations

pledgeverb [T]

uk   us   /pledʒ/
to make a ​formal promise to do something: pledge to do sth The UK ​chiefexecutive has pledged to ​slashcosts by £150m a ​year by 2014.pledge $32m/£100,000, etc. to/for sth EU ​leaders pledged $1.2 ​billion to the ​region over the next 18 months.pledge that sth He pledged that a ​reduction in the ​burden of ​taxation will become the ​centraleconomicobjective of the ​government.
LAW to give something ​valuable to a ​person or ​organization that has ​lent you ​money, which they can ​keep if you ​fail to ​pay back the ​loan: pledge sth as collateral/security Shares are ​frequently pledged as ​collateral for ​loans.

pledgenoun [C]

uk   us   /pledʒ/
a ​formal promise to do something: a campaign/​election/manifesto pledgea pledge to do sth Analysts warn that OPEC's pledge to ramp up ​oilproduction in ​order to ​easerecordcrudeprices will not have the desired ​effect.make/honour/sign a pledge Campaigners have ​accusedCongress of ​failing to ​honour its US ​funding pledges.a pledge that sth Their ​goal of ​increasing electricity ​production from ​renewables by 40% has been ​reinforced by a pledge that they will not ​support further ​development of ​nuclearpower.
LAW something ​valuable that is given to a ​person or ​organization that has ​lent you ​money, which they can ​keep if you ​fail to ​pay back the ​loan: Serious ​financialirregularities took ​place, ​including the pledge of already paid-for securities.
(Definition of pledge from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of pledge?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“pledge” in Business English

Word of the Day
faith school

a school that is financially supported by a particular religious group, usually for children from that religion

Word of the Day

Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
by Cambridge Dictionaries Online,
August 27, 2015
The English language is constantly changing. You know that. But did you know that at Cambridge Dictionaries Online we keep track of the changes? We continually add new words and new meanings to our online dictionary for learners of English. Some of them are new to English entirely (neologisms), and some

Read More 

hyperpalatable adjective
hyperpalatable adjective
August 24, 2015
describes food with heightened levels of sugar and salt, intended to be extremely appealing In Brazil, where the prevalence of overweight and obese adults has doubled since 1980, crisps, biscuits, energy bars and sugary drinks formulated to be ‘hyper-palatable’ are much more widely eaten than previously.

Read More