position Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “position” - English Dictionary

Definition of "position" - American English Dictionary

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positionnoun

 us   /pəˈzɪʃ·ən/

position noun (PLACE)

[C/U] the ​place where something or someone is, often in ​relation to other things: [C] I’ve ​switched the positions of the ​sofa and the ​chair. [C/U] In ​sports, a position is the ​place where you ​play on ​yourteam, or the ​responsibilities of someone who ​plays in that ​place: [C] He ​played the shortstop position when he ​started in ​baseball.

position noun (RANK)

[C] a ​rank or ​level in a ​company, ​competition, or ​society: She’s ​devoted her ​life to ​improving the position of women in ​society. [C] A position in a ​company or ​organization is also a ​job: He ​applied for the position of ​marketingmanager.

position noun (SITUATION)

[C usually sing] a ​situation or ​condition: a ​shakyfinancial position She ​found herself in a ​difficult position and didn’t ​know what to say. [C usually sing] If you are in a position to do something, you are ​able to do it, usually because you have the ​necessarypower or ​money: [+ to infinitive] Do you ​think she’s in a position to ​help you?

position noun (OPINION)

[C] a way of ​thinking about a ​particularmatter; ​opinion: Our position is that we’ve made a very ​fairoffer to ​settle this ​dispute.

position noun (ARRANGEMENT OF BODY)

[C] the way in which the ​body is ​arranged: My ​knees get ​stiff when I ​sit in the same position for a ​longtime.
position
verb [T]  us   /pəˈzɪʃ·ən/
The ​SecretService men ​quickly positioned themselves around the ​president.
(Definition of position from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "position" - British English Dictionary

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positionnoun

uk   us   /pəˈzɪʃ.ən/

position noun (PLACE)

B1 [C] the ​place where something or someone is, often in ​relation to other things: Well, I've ​foundour position on the ​map if you ​want to ​see where we are. You've ​moved the ​furniture around - the ​sofa is in a different position. [C] (in ​teamsports) the ​part someone ​plays in a ​game, ​relating to the ​area of the ​field in which they ​mostlyplay: I didn't ​know you ​playedhockey - what position do you ​play?C1 [C or U] the ​place where ​people are ​sent in ​order to ​carry out a ​course of ​action: The ​troops took up ​theirbattle positions at the ​frontline. As ​soon as his ​officers were in position/had ​moved into position, the ​policecommanderwalked up the ​path towards the ​house.
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position noun (SITUATION)

B1 [C usually singular] a ​situation: My ​financial position is ​somewhatprecarious at the ​moment. When two of ​yourbestfriendsargue, it puts you in a very ​awkward position.be in a position to do sth C1 to be ​able to do something, usually because you have the ​necessaryexperience, ​authority, or ​money: I'm not in a position to ​reveal any of the ​details of the ​project at ​present. I'm ​sure they'd like to ​help her out ​financially, but they're not in a position to do so.
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position noun (RANK)

B2 [C] a ​rank or ​level in a ​company, ​competition, or ​society: Whether or not you're given a ​cardepends on ​your position in the ​company.UK She ​finished the ​race in third position.B2 [C] a ​job: She ​applied for a position in the ​firm that I ​work for.
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position noun (ARRANGEMENT)

B1 [C] the way in which something is ​arranged: I go to ​sleep on my back but I always ​wake up in a different position. Keep the ​bottles in an ​upright position. This is not a very ​comfortable position.
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position noun (OPINION)

[C usually singular] formal an ​opinion: What's the company's position onrecycling? He takes the position (= ​believes) that ​individuals have a ​responsibility to ​look after themselves.
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positionverb [T usually + adv/prep]

uk   us   /pəˈzɪʃ.ən/
to put something or someone in a ​particularplace: The ​army had been positioned to the ​north and ​east of the ​city. When it came to ​seatingpeople for ​dinner, I positioned myself as ​far away from him as ​possible.
(Definition of position from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "position" - Business English Dictionary

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positionnoun [C]

uk   us   /pəˈzɪʃən/
HR, WORKPLACE a ​job, especially one that is important: advertise/fill a position We hope to ​fill the position within the next two months.apply for/take up/fill a position She will soon take up an important position with a ​firm of ​lawyers. He ​filled the position of Executive Director recently ​vacated by Terry John.
a ​rank or ​level of ​success in a ​company, in ​society, etc.: establish/gain/hold a position He took ​advantage of every ​opportunity to ​establish his position within the ​company.strengthen sb's position Industry ​insiders said the ​move would ​strengthen the position of the ​chiefexecutive on the ​board.
a ​situation that someone or something is in: The bank's position looks difficult, to say the least.put sb/sth in a position This decision put me in an awkward position with ​regard to my ​staff. They were not ​willing to ​release details of the company's financial position.be in a strong/weak position Luckily, we were in a ​strong position compared to the ​competition.reach a/the position We want to ​reach a position where we can ​pay off the ​debt.consolidate/strengthen/weaken sb's position This ​news will ​serve to ​consolidate our position in the ​market.
an ​opinion on an important ​subject: position on sth What's the company's position on ​outsourcing?take the position that The Board will certainly take the position that their decision was justified.take a position (on sth) When you are ​negotiating, you will need to take a position and be prepared to ​stick to it.
FINANCE the fact of ​investing in something, or the ​totalamount that is ​invested: take a position (on sth) Investors can take a position on any ​stockquoted in London.hedge a position The ​riskier the ​stock, the more you will need to ​hedge your position.
be in a position to do sth to be able to do something, usually because you have the necessary ​experience, ​authority, or ​money: Nine months ago, we were not in a position to announce the ​expansionplan.

positionverb [T]

uk   us   /pəˈzɪʃən/
to put something or someone in a particular position or ​situation: The ​company has positioned itself as the country's ​leadingtextilemanufacturer.be well/ideally positioned to do sth We are well positioned to be able to ​deal with a ​downturn in the ​economy.
MARKETING to ​advertise a ​product or ​service so that ​peoplethink about it in a particular way, and so that it is attractive to a particular ​part of the ​market: position sth as sth Its ​high-endpriceticket has positioned it as a ​luxuryitem.
(Definition of position from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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