powder Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of “powder” - English Dictionary

"powder" in American English

See all translations

powdernoun [C/U]

 us   /ˈpɑʊ·dər/
a loose, dry substance of extremely small pieces, usually made by breaking up something into smaller parts and crushing them
Powder is also any of various loose, dry, usually pleasant-smelling substances that people put on their skin as a help in healing or as makeup: [U] talcum powder
Powder is also gunpowder.
(Definition of powder from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"powder" in British English

See all translations

powdernoun

uk   /ˈpaʊ.dər/  us   /ˈpaʊ.dɚ/
B1 [C or U] a loose, dry substance that consists of extremely small pieces, usually made by breaking something up and crushing it: curry/chilli powder talcum powder A packet of white powder was found and police scientists are analysing it. You'll get more flavour from the spices if you grind them into a powder.UK Why are there so many adverts for washing powders on TV? You can buy milk in powder form.
See also
[U] a soft, dry substance that is spread over the skin of the face, in order to stop the skin from looking shiny: face powder Dust the face lightly with powder.
[U] fallen snow that is loose and dry and has not begun to melt: I love skiing in deep powder.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

powdery
adjective uk   /ˈpaʊ.dər.i/  us   /ˈpaʊ.dɚ.i/
The snow was fresh and powdery.

powderverb [T]

uk   /ˈpaʊ.dər/  us   /ˈpaʊ.dɚ/
(Definition of powder from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of powder?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
by ,
May 24, 2016
by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

Read More 

Word of the Day

shade

to prevent direct light from shining on something

Word of the Day

convo noun
convo noun
May 23, 2016
informal a conversation The convo around concussions mostly focuses on guys who play football, but Chastain thinks that this whole thing could be a headache for women too.

Read More