pressure Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “pressure” - English Dictionary

Definition of "pressure" - American English Dictionary

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pressurenoun

 us   /ˈpreʃ·ər/

pressure noun (FORCE)

[C/U] the ​forceproduced by ​pressing against something: [U] air/​blood/​water pressure physics [C/U] Pressure is also the ​force that is put on a ​surface with ​reference to the ​area of the ​surface.

pressure noun (INFLUENCE)

[C/U] a ​strong, often ​threateninginfluence on an ​organization or ​person: [C] Competitive pressures will ​force the ​company to ​sell off ​itsfactories. [C/U] If you put pressure on someone, you ​try to ​cause that ​person to do something by ​persuading or ​threatening them: [U] They put a lot of pressure on him to ​resign.

pressure noun (WORRY)

[U] worry and ​fear caused by the ​feeling that you have too many ​responsibilities and ​cares: I like this ​job – there’s not so much pressure to ​produce every ​day.
pressure
verb [T]  us   /ˈpreʃ·ər/
She was pressured into ​signing the ​agreement.
(Definition of pressure from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "pressure" - British English Dictionary

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pressurenoun

uk   /ˈpreʃ.ər/  us   //

pressure noun (PUSHING)

C2 [U] the ​force you ​produce when you ​press something: He put too much pressure on the ​doorhandle and it ​snapped. You can ​stopbleeding by applying pressure ​close to the ​injuredarea.C1 [C or U] the ​force that a ​liquid or ​gasproduces when it ​presses against an ​area: gas/​water pressure The new ​materialallows the ​company to make ​gaspipes which ​withstandhigher pressures. The ​gas is ​stored under pressure (= in a ​container which ​keeps it at a ​higher pressure than it would usually have).
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pressure noun (PERSUADING)

B2 the ​act of ​trying to make someone ​else do something by ​arguing, ​persuading, etc.: public/​political pressure Teachers are underincreasing pressure to ​worklongerhours. [+ to infinitive] Pressure toabandon the new ​motorway is ​increasing. The ​government is ​facing pressure fromenvironmentalactivists. The Defence ​Secretaryresigned under pressure from the Prime Minister (= because the Prime Ministerforced him to). She's putting pressure on him (= ​trying to ​persuade him) to get ​married.formal The ​internationalcommunity is ​trying to bring pressure to ​bear on the ​government (= ​trying to ​persuade them) to ​resolve the ​situation.B2 [C or U] a ​difficultsituation that makes you ​feelworried or ​unhappy: She's got a lot of pressure on her at ​work just now. Be ​nice to him - he's been under a lot of pressure ​recently. Can you ​work well under pressure? the pressures ofworkso no pressure then! humorous something that you say when what someone has just said makes you ​feel that you must ​try very hard to do something: "These ​exams are the most ​important of all." "Oh, so no pressure then!" [U] a ​situation in a ​footballgame in which ​attackingplayers are ​movingforward and getting ​closer to ​scoring a ​goal, and ​players from the ​opposingteam have to ​work hard to ​stop them from ​scoring: Ryan Giggs put the ​homedefence under pressure. Playing four ​forwards puts too much pressure on the ​defence.
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pressureverb [T]

uk   /ˈpreʃ.ər/  us   // US (UK pressurize)
to ​stronglypersuade someone to do something they do not ​want to do: She was pressured intojoining the ​club.
(Definition of pressure from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "pressure" - Business English Dictionary

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pressurenoun [C or U]

uk   us   /ˈpreʃər/
a ​situation in which someone ​tries to make someone else do something by arguing, persuading, etc.: public/​political pressure The guidelines were ​imposed under pressure fromCongress.
a difficult ​situation, or the worried ​feeling that such a ​situation can give you: pressure on sb She's got a lot of pressure on her at ​work just now. He doesn't ​work well under pressure. The pressures of ​work are making her ​depressed.
put pressure on sb/sth to put someone or something in a difficult ​situation, or to ​try and persuade or ​force someone to do something: Analysts said the ​lack of ​supply would undoubtedly put pressure on ​prices.
(Definition of pressure from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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