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Definition of “price” - English Dictionary

"price" in American English

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pricenoun [C]

us   /prɑɪs/
the amount of money for which something is sold or offered for sale: high/low prices The price of gas went up five cents a gallon.
price
verb [T] us   /prɑɪs/
The car is priced at $24,000.
Idioms
(Definition of price from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"price" in British English

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pricenoun [C]

uk   /praɪs/ us   /praɪs/
A2 [C] the amount of money for which something is sold: The price of oil has risen sharply. House prices have been falling. We thought they were asking a very high/low price. The large supermarkets are offering big price cuts.
C1 [S] the unpleasant results that you must accept or experience for getting or doing something: Perhaps being unpopular is the price of success. An extra few minutes at the airport is a small price to pay for safe travel.

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priceverb

uk   /praɪs/ us   /praɪs/
C1 [T often passive] to say what the price of something is: The car is priced at £28,000. There is a lack of reasonably priced housing for rent.
[T] to discover how much something costs: We went around all the travel agents pricing the different tours.

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(Definition of price from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"price" in Business English

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pricenoun [C]

uk   /praɪs/ us   MONEY, FINANCE
the amount of money for which something is sold or offered for sale: at/for a price We managed to purchase the business for a reasonable price.house/oil/share prices Large increases in house prices have given a strong boost to consumer spending. During the last week of May, share prices surged.a competitive/fair/reasonable price The company hopes to sell its biofuel at a competitive price.a high/low price They sold the property for a high price.falling/rising prices Falling prices should be good news for textile producers.agree/agree on a price It took some time before we could agree on a price increase/put up/raise prices They're quite willing to raise prices when there are more people wanting to buy something than there are units available for sale.cut/reduce/slash prices Companies are slashing prices in an attempt to attract customers who are reluctant to spend.price increases/reductions/rises A spokesman confirmed that the price increases would take effect from next month.a price of $50/£300/€10,000, etc. The stocks reached a price of $25. The plumber will estimate how long the work will take and give the customer a price for labor. Some retailers are still selling the goods at full price.
at/for a price
for a lot of money: Almost anything can be fixed for a price.
put a price on sth
to say how much something costs, or is worth: The latest development makes it difficult to put a price on other bonds and loans. Staff loyalty is something that you can't really put a price on.

priceverb [T]

uk   /praɪs/ us  
COMMERCE, MARKETING to decide the price of a particular product or service: price sth at sth With tickets priced at $300 a person, proceeds from the event are to be given to charity. Many stocks are priced as if oil were still $28 to $30 a barrel.price sth high/low The sales team felt that the new product had been priced too low.attractively/competitively priced The major mining stocks look attractively priced, and our recommendation is to buy.moderately/reasonably priced The sales staff always stay at a moderately priced hotel.
also price sth up to compare prices of similar products or services: We priced up the various systems on offer before deciding to go for this one.
also price sth up COMMERCE to put a ticket or label on goods in a store to show how much they cost: All these items need pricing up before they go on display. The gadget had been wrongly priced by the store, but they agreed to sell it to me for the price on the label.
price yourself/sb/sth out of the market
COMMERCE to charge so much for a product or service that people cannot or do not want to buy it: By setting the price at that level we had effectively priced ourselves out of the market. With house prices and mortgage rates so high, first-time buyers are effectively priced out of the market.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of price from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “price”
in Korean 가격…
in Arabic سِعْر…
in Malaysian harga…
in French prix…
in Russian цена, жертва…
in Chinese (Traditional) 價格,價錢…
in Italian prezzo…
in Turkish fiyat, bedel, karşılık…
in Polish cena…
in Spanish precio…
in Vietnamese giá cả, cái giá…
in Portuguese preço…
in Thai ราคา, ผลตอบแทน…
in German der Preis…
in Catalan preu…
in Japanese 値段, 価格…
in Chinese (Simplified) 价格,价钱…
in Indonesian harga…
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“price” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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