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Definition of “principal” - English Dictionary

"principal" in American English

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principaladjective [not gradable]

 us   /ˈprɪn·sə·pəl/
first in ​order of ​importance: Iraq’s principal ​export is ​oil.

principalnoun

 us   /ˈprɪn·sə·pəl/
  • principal noun (PERSON)

[C] a ​person in ​charge of a ​school
  • principal noun (MONEY)

[C usually sing] an ​amount of ​money that is ​lent, ​borrowed, or ​invested, ​apart from any ​additionalmoney such as ​interest
(Definition of principal from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"principal" in British English

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principaladjective [before noun]

uk   /ˈprɪn.sə.pəl/  us   /ˈprɪn.sə.pəl/
B1 first in ​order of ​importance: Iraq's principal ​export is ​oil. He was principal ​dancer at the Dance Theatre of Harlem. That was my principal ​reason for ​moving.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

principalnoun

uk   /ˈprɪn.sə.pəl/  us   /ˈprɪn.sə.pəl/
(Definition of principal from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"principal" in Business English

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principaladjective

uk   us   /ˈprɪnsəpəl/
first in ​order of ​importance: Iraq's principal ​export is ​oil. Nigeria remains the country's principal ​economicpartner.
FINANCE, ECONOMICS relating to an ​amount of ​moneylent or ​borrowed, rather than to the ​interestpaid on it: Shares of these ​funds involve ​investmentrisk, ​including the possible ​loss of the principal ​amountinvested.

principalnoun

uk   us   /ˈprɪnsəpəl/
[C usually singular] FINANCE an ​amount of ​moneylent or ​borrowed, rather than the ​interestpaid on it: She ​lives off the ​interest and ​tries to ​keep the principal intact. These ​bonds involve the ​risk that the ​issuingcompany may be unable to ​payinterest or repay principal. The ​money is ​secured by the borrower's ​home, which is ​sold after the borrower's death to ​pay off the ​interest and principal.
[C] LAW a ​person who is directly involved in an ​arrangement, ​agreement, etc., rather than someone ​acting for that ​person: Once the principals ​sign the necessary ​papers the ​deal will be done.
[C] LAW a ​person who has ​legalresponsibility for what a ​business or ​organization does: I later became a principal at an ​investmentbankingfirm.
(Definition of principal from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “principal”
in Korean 주요한…
in Arabic رَئيسي…
in Malaysian utama…
in French principal…
in Russian главный, основной…
in Chinese (Traditional) 最重要的…
in Italian principale…
in Turkish ana, asıl, esas…
in Polish główny…
in Spanish principal…
in Vietnamese chính…
in Portuguese principal, mais importante…
in Thai สำคัญมากกว่าอย่างอื่น…
in German hauptsächlich…
in Catalan principal…
in Japanese 主な, 最も重要な, 主要な…
in Chinese (Simplified) 最重要的…
in Indonesian terpenting…
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“principal” in Business English

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