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Definition of “print” - English Dictionary

"print" in American English

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printverb [T]

 us   /prɪnt/
  • print verb [T] (MAKE TEXT)

to put ​letters or ​images on ​paper or another ​material using a ​machine, or to ​producebooks, ​magazines, ​newspapers, etc., in this way: The ​newspaper printed my ​letter to the ​editor.
To print is also to write without ​joining the ​letters together: Please print ​yournameclearly below ​yoursignature.
To print something out is to print ​text or ​images from a ​machineattached to a ​computer: [M] Just print out the first two ​pages.

printnoun

 us   /prɪnt/
  • print noun (PICTURE)

[C] a ​singlephotograph made from ​film, or a ​photograph of a ​painting or other ​work of ​art: We made ​extra prints of the ​baby to ​send out with the ​birthannouncement.
[C] A print is also a ​picture made by ​pressingpaper or other ​material against a ​specialsurfacecovered with ​ink: woodcut prints
  • print noun (PATTERN)

[C] a ​patternproduced on a ​piece of ​cloth, or ​cloth having such a ​pattern: a print ​dress
  • print noun (MARK)

[C] a ​markleft on a ​surface where something has been ​pressed on it: The ​dogleft prints all over the ​kitchenfloor.
[C] A print is also a ​fingerprint.
  • print noun (TEXT)

[U] text or ​images that are ​produced on ​paper or other ​material by printing
in print
If something is in print, it is ​published and ​available to ​buy: Is the ​book still in print?
out of print
If a ​book is out of print, it is no ​longeravailable from a ​publisher: I’m ​afraid you can’t get that ​book – it’s out of print.
(Definition of print from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"print" in British English

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printnoun

uk   /prɪnt/  us   /prɪnt/
  • print noun (TEXT)

C2 [U] letters, ​numbers, or ​symbols that have been ​produced on ​paper by a ​machine using ​ink: The ​title is in ​bold print. This ​novel is ​available in ​large print for ​readers with ​pooreyesight. The ​book was ​rushed into print (= was ​produced and ​published) as ​quickly as ​possible. The print ​quality (= the ​quality of the ​textproduced) of the new ​laserprinter is ​excellent.
[U] newspapers, ​books, and ​magazines: The ​debate is still ​raging, both in print and ​online.
in/out of print
C2 If a ​book is in print, it is ​possible to ​buy a new ​copy of it, and if it is out of print, it is not now ​possible: Is her ​work still in print? Classic ​literature never goes out of print.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • print noun (PICTURE)

C1 [C] a ​photographiccopy of a ​painting, or a ​picture made by ​pressingpaper onto a ​specialsurfacecovered in ​ink, or a ​singlephotograph from a ​film: a print of Van Gogh's "Sunflowers" a ​signed Hockney print I had some prints made of the ​partyphotos.

printverb

uk   /prɪnt/  us   /prɪnt/
  • print verb (TEXT)

A2 [I or T] to ​produce writing or ​images on ​paper or other ​material with a ​machine: The ​leaflets will be printed onrecycledpaper. I'm ​waiting for a ​document to print.
B2 [T] to ​include a ​piece of writing in a ​newspaper or ​magazine: Some ​newspapers still ​refuse to print ​certainswear words. They printed his ​letter in Tuesday's ​paper.
B2 [T] to ​produce a ​newspaper, ​magazine, or ​book in ​largequantities: 20,000 ​copies of the ​novel will be printed in ​hardback.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • print verb (WRITE)

[I or T] to write without ​joining the ​letters together: Please print ​yournameclearly below ​yoursignature.
  • print verb (PATTERN)

[T] to ​produce a ​pattern on ​material or ​paper: The ​designs are printed onto the ​fabric by ​hand.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of print from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"print" in Business English

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printverb

uk   us   /prɪnt/ COMMUNICATIONS
[I or T] to ​produce writing or ​images on ​paper or other ​material with a ​machine: print sth on sth The ​leaflets will be printed on ​recycledpaper. I'm waiting for the ​document to print. I had some ​businesscards printed. Words ​found in the glossary are printed in bold the first ​time they appear in the ​prospectus.
[T] to ​include a ​piece of writing in a ​newspaper or ​magazine: No one was ​willing to print the story without ​identifying its ​source. The ​article was printed in Tuesday's ​paper.
[T] to ​produce a ​newspaper, ​magazine, or ​book in large ​quantities: 20,000 ​copies of the novel will be printed in hardback.
[I or T] to write without ​joining the ​letters together: Please print your ​name clearly below your ​signature.
Phrasal verbs

printnoun [U]

uk   us   /prɪnt/
letters, ​numbers, words, or ​symbols that have been ​produced on ​paper by a ​machine using ​ink: The ​report is being ​published both in print and ​online.
newspapers, ​books, and ​magazines: Television, radio, and print are inundated with ​advertisements for Web ​sites.
in/out of print
if a ​book is in print, it is possible to ​buy a new ​copy of it, and if it is out of print, it is not now possible: Is her ​work still in print? That ​book has been out of print for ​years.
(Definition of print from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“print” in Business English

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