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Definition of “privilege” - English Dictionary

"privilege" in American English

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privilegenoun [C/U]

 us   /ˈprɪv·ə·lɪdʒ, ˈprɪv·lɪdʒ/
a ​specialadvantage or ​authoritypossessed by a ​particularperson or ​group: [C] As a ​seniorexecutive, you will ​enjoycertain privileges. [C] I had the privilege (= the ​honor) of interviewing the ​primeminister of Canada.
(Definition of privilege from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"privilege" in British English

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privilegenoun

uk   /ˈprɪv.əl.ɪdʒ/  us   /ˈprɪv.əl.ɪdʒ/
C1 [C or U] an ​advantage that only one ​person or ​group of ​people has, usually because of ​theirposition or because they are ​rich: Healthcare should be a ​right, not a privilege. Senior ​management enjoycertain privileges, such as ​companycars and ​healthinsurance.
C1 [S] an ​opportunity to do something ​special or ​enjoyable: I had the privilege ofinterviewing Picasso in the 1960s. It was a ​real privilege tomeet her.
[U] the way in which ​richpeople or ​people from a high ​socialclass have most of the ​advantages in ​society: a ​life of privilege
[C or U] specialized law the ​specialright that some ​people in ​authority have that ​allows them to do or say things that other ​people are not ​allowed to: diplomatic/​parliamentary privilege

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(Definition of privilege from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"privilege" in Business English

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privilegenoun [C or U]

uk   us   /ˈprɪvəlɪdʒ/
a ​right or ​advantage that only a ​smallnumber of ​people have: At the moment, it tends to be ​managers or technology-related ​workers who ​work from ​home - it's seen as something of a privilege for ​trustedemployees. With power and privilege comes ​responsibility.be a privilege doing/to do sth It's been a pleasure and a privilege to ​work with you all.have the privilege of doing sth I had the privilege of ​studying at one of the country's ​leadingbusiness schools.for the privilege of doing sth Advertisers often ​subsidize entire TV productions or movie ​marketingcampaigns for the privilege of ​featuring their ​brands.enjoy/earn a privilege It is possible that the ​company will one day ​command a ​premiumrating, but the ​market clearly believes it has to ​earn that privilege.
LAW legalprotection that a ​person or a ​group has because of their ​position within a ​society, for ​example the ​right to ​keep particular discussions, etc. ​private: the attorney-client privilege Executive privilegemeans that ​certaindocuments will not have to be ​disclosed.
(Definition of privilege from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“privilege” in Business English

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