probe Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “probe” - English Dictionary

Definition of "probe" - American English Dictionary

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probeverb [I/T]

 us   /proʊb/
to ​search into or ​examine something: [I] Investigators are probing into new ​evidence in the ​case. To probe something with a ​tool is to ​examine it: [T] Using a ​specialinstrument, the ​doctor probed the ​wound for the ​bullet.

probenoun [C]

 us   /proʊb/
a ​careful and ​detailedexamination: The probe ​exploredallegations of ​corruption in the ​policedepartment. A probe is also a ​long, ​thintool used by ​doctors in ​medicalexaminations or ​operations.
(Definition of probe from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "probe" - British English Dictionary

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probeverb [I or T]

uk   /prəʊb/  us   /proʊb/
to ​try to ​discoverinformation that other ​people do not ​want you to ​know, by ​askingquestionscarefully and not ​directly: The ​interviewer probed ​deep into her ​privatelife. Detectives ​questioned him for ​hours, probing for any inconsistencies in his ​story. The ​article probes (= ​tries to ​describe and ​explain) the ​mysteries of ​nationalism in ​modernEurope. to ​examine something with a ​tool, ​especially in ​order to ​find something that is ​hidden: They probed in/into the ​mud with a ​specialdrill.

probenoun [C]

uk   /prəʊb/  us   /proʊb/
an ​attempt to ​discoverinformation by ​asking a lot of ​questions: an FBI probe intocorruption a Justice Department probe into the Democrats' ​fundraising specialized medical a ​long, ​thinmetaltool used by ​doctors to ​examine inside someone specialized science a ​device that is put inside something to ​test or ​recordinformation
See also
(Definition of probe from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "probe" - Business English Dictionary

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probenoun [C]

uk   us   /prəʊb/
the ​process of ​askingquestions and ​examining facts in a ​situation, often in ​order to discover ​information that someone may be hiding: corruption/criminal/federal probe Alarm bells rang around the City after the ​investmentbank revealed it had widened its ​accounting probes. a probe into sth The ​fundmanager was arrested ​following a probe into ​allegedcorruption.launch/conduct/open a probe The Swiss Banking ​Commission is ​conducting a probe into possible ​insiderdealing.

probeverb [I or T]

uk   us   /prəʊb/
to ​try to discover ​information about a ​situation by ​askingquestions and ​examining facts: probe into sth High-end ​investors began to probe into the fund's ​performance and ​demanded better ​returns. He says the problems ​prompted him as a journalist to probe ​deeper, ​even after the ​issues disappeared from the ​media.
(Definition of probe from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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