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Definition of “profile” - English Dictionary

"profile" in American English

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profilenoun

 us   /ˈproʊ·fɑɪl/
  • profile noun (SIDE VIEW)

[C/U] a ​sideview of a person’s ​face: [C] I’d ​seen her profile on a ​billboard. [U] A ​face in profile never ​looks at the ​viewer.
  • profile noun (DESCRIPTION)

[C] a ​description of someone ​containing all the most ​important or ​interestingfacts about the ​person: There’s a profile of ​producer Hal Willner in "New York" ​magazine.
  • profile noun (ATTENTION)

[C usually sing] the ​amount of ​publicattention that someone or something ​receives: He ​keeps a ​low profile and doesn’t go after ​headlines. She has had a high profile in the ​world of ​fashion for many ​years.
profile
verb [T]  us   /ˈproʊ·fɑɪl/
Gilbert was ​recently profiled by a Washington ​businessmagazine.
(Definition of profile from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"profile" in British English

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profilenoun [C]

uk   /ˈprəʊ.faɪl/  us   /ˈproʊ.faɪl/
  • profile noun [C] (DESCRIPTION)

B2 a ​shortdescription of someone's ​life, ​work, ​character, etc.
information about a person's ​life, ​work, ​interests, etc. on a socialnetworkingwebsite: You can ​postyourrelationshipstatus on ​yourFacebook profile.

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  • profile noun [C] (ATTENTION)

C1 the ​amount of ​publicattention and ​notice that something ​receives: We need to ​increaseour company's profile in ​Asia. There is a ​growingnumber of women in high-profile ​positions (= ​positions which they are ​noticed) in the ​government.

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  • profile noun [C] (SIDE VIEW)

a ​sideview of a person's ​face: Drawing profiles is ​somehoweasier than ​drawing the ​fullface. a ​strong profile The ​actor is ​photographed in profile, ​smoking a ​cigarette.
profile
verb [T] uk   us  
Every ​week in the ​bookssection of the ​paper they profile a different ​author.
(Definition of profile from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"profile" in Business English

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profilenoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈprəʊfaɪl/
a ​short description of someone or something that gives important and useful details about them: a profile of sb/sth The ​websitelists more than 1,000 profiles of ​smallcompanies. A ​recruitingfirm can view the ​candidate profiles, but ​candidates' ​identities are ​protected until a ​joboffer appears.a credit/financial profile Homes are ​sold at ​higherinterestrates to ​consumers with ​riskiercredit profiles.
the ​amount of ​publicattention that something or someone receives: The company's high profile helped them receive ​close to $10 million in ​state and ​localincentives. The Federation of Master Builders has been ​working to raise its profile.
keep a low profile
to ​avoidattractingattention to yourself: The ​company has ​tried to ​keep a ​low profile since the controversy.

profileverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈprəʊfaɪl/
to give a ​short description of someone or something with important and useful details about them: In her new ​report she profiles ​companies with ​realprofits and ​provenbusinessmodels.profile sb/sth in/on sth A ​number of ​businesswomen are profiled on the ​careerswebsite.
(Definition of profile from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“profile” in Business English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
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April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

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