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Definition of “prospect” - English Dictionary

"prospect" in American English

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prospectnoun [C/U]

 us   /ˈprɑs·pekt/
  • prospect noun [C/U] (POSSIBILITY)

the ​possibility or ​likelihood that something will ​happen: [C] Losing the ​elections is a prospect that still ​appearsunlikely. [U] She smiled at the prospect of ​seeing him again. [pl] Prospects (= Chances for ​success) in the ​computerindustry are ​excellent.

prospectverb [I]

 us   /ˈprɑs·pekt/
  • prospect verb [I] (SEARCH)

to ​search for ​gold, ​oil, or other ​valuablesubstances on or under the ​surface of the ​earth
prospector
noun [C]  us   /ˈprɑsˌpek·tər/
a prospector ​searching for ​gold
(Definition of prospect from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"prospect" in British English

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prospectnoun

uk   /ˈprɒs.pekt/  us   /ˈprɑː.spekt/
  • prospect noun (POSSIBILITY)

B2 [C or U] the ​possibility that something good might ​happen in the ​future: Is there any prospect of the ​weatherimproving? There ​seems little prospect of an end to the ​dispute. [+ that] There's not much prospect that this ​war will be over ​soon. There's every prospect ofsuccess.prospects B2 [plural] the ​possibility of being ​successful, ​especially at ​work: She's ​hoping the ​course will ​improve her career prospects. Prospects of/for (= ​opportunities for)employmentremainbleak for most ​people in the ​area.C2 [S] the ​idea of something that will or might ​happen in the ​future: The prospect ofspending three ​wholedays with her ​fills me with ​horror. I'm very ​excited at the prospect ofseeing her again. We ​face the prospect of having to ​start all over again. [C] a ​person who might be ​chosen, for ​example as an ​employee: We'll be ​interviewing four more prospects for the ​jobs this ​afternoon.

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  • prospect noun (VIEW)

[C] formal a good ​view of a ​largelandarea or of a ​city: From the ​restaurant there was a ​marvellous prospect of/over the ​valley and the ​mountains beyond.

prospectverb [I]

uk   /ˈprɒs.pekt/  us   /ˈprɑː.spekt/
to ​search for ​gold, ​oil, or other ​valuablesubstances on or under the ​surface of the ​earth: to prospect foroil/​gold
prospector
noun [C] uk   /prəˈspek.tər/  us   /-t̬ɚ/
a prospector ​looking for ​gold
(Definition of prospect from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"prospect" in Business English

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prospectnoun

uk   us   /ˈprɒspekt/
[C or U] the possibility that something might ​happen in the future, especially something good: there is little/no prospect of sth There is little prospect of the ​tradeembargo being ​lifted this ​year. Is there any prospect that serious ​change in the administration's ​economicpolicies could ​emerge from this ​session?
prospects [plural] the possibility of being ​successful in the future: The ​market remains sceptical about the bank's prospects.prospects for sth Investors are becoming ​increasinglyexcited about prospects for the new ​drug. The growth prospects of the ​medical and ​healthcareequipmentindustry are promising.sb's career/job prospects Having a wide ​range of ​interests can ​improve your ​job prospects. business/​economic/​financial prospects
in prospect formal likely to ​happen in future: Another ​rise in ​interestrates is in prospect.
[S] the fact that something might or will ​happen in the future: The ​company faces the prospect of a new ​competitorentering the ​market with a better ​offer. These ​sanctions raise the prospect of a ​damaging Pacific ​tradewar.
[C] MARKETING a possible future ​customer: Frequently, a ​salesperson has only a ​limitedamount of ​time for ​contact with ​customers and prospects.
[C] HR a ​person who might be chosen as an ​employee: a prospect for sth We will ​interview four more prospects for the ​post this afternoon.
[C] someone or something that is likely to ​succeed in the future: This ​product was clearly a better prospect for advertisers.

prospectverb [I]

uk   us   /ˈprɒspekt/
NATURAL RESOURCES to ​search for ​gold, ​oil, or other ​valuable substances on or under the surface of the Earth: prospect for sth The ​company will begin prospecting for diamonds in northwest Russia under a new ​jointventure.
to ​try to ​achieve, ​create, or ​find something: prospect for sth The ​internet promises one of the ​cheapestmethods of prospecting for new ​clients.
(Definition of prospect from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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