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Definition of “protest” - English Dictionary

"protest" in American English

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protestnoun [C/U]

us   /ˈproʊ·test/
a strong complaint expressing disagreement, disapproval, or opposition: [U] Three board members walked out of the meeting in protest. [C] A protest against capital punishment was held outside the courthouse. [U] He paid the tax under protest to avoid a penalty.

protestverb [I/T]

us   /prəˈtest, ˈproʊ·test/
to express disagreement with, disapproval of, or opposition to something by complaining strongly about it: [I/T] Groups of students have been protesting (against) the tuition increase.
(Definition of protest from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"protest" in British English

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protestnoun

uk   /ˈprəʊ.test/ us   /proʊˈtest/
[C or U] a strong complaint expressing disagreement, disapproval, or opposition: Protests have been made/registered by many people who would be affected by the proposed changes. A formal protest was made by the German team about their disqualification from the relay final. Conservation groups have united in protest against the planned new road.
B2 [C] an occasion when people show that they disagree with something by standing somewhere, shouting, carrying signs, etc.: a public protest against the war a peaceful/violent protest
under protest
If something is done under protest, it is done unwillingly: I only went to the meeting under protest.

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protestverb [I or T]

uk   /prəˈtest/ us   /ˈproʊ.test/
B2 to show that you disagree with something by standing somewhere, shouting, carrying signs, etc.: A big crowd of demonstrators were protesting against cuts in health spending.especially US Outside, a group of students were protesting research cuts.
B2 to say something forcefully or complain about something: Lots of people protested about the new working hours. They protested bitterly to their employers, but to no avail. [+ that] A young girl was crying, protesting that she didn't want to leave her mother. All through the trial he protested his innocence (= strongly said he was not guilty).

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(Definition of protest from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"protest" in Business English

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protestnoun

uk   /ˈprəʊtest/ us  
[C or U] a strong complaint against something, or the act of complaining strongly about it: an angry/big/formal protest The chief executive of the troubled company gave up a £2.8m bonus package after big protests.in protest against/at sth He resigned in protest at the refusal to privatise the airline. The length of directors' contracts attracted a storm of protest from small shareholders at last year's annual meeting.
[C] an occasion when people show that they disagree strongly with something by standing together and shouting and carrying signs, especially on the streets: hold/organize/stage a protest Shareholders held protests against the takeover bid outside the Stock Exchange.spark/trigger a protest The plan sparked days of street protests. a large/mass/peaceful protest a protest demonstration/march
under protest
if something is done under protest, it is done unwillingly: In the cruise-ship industry, some companies are paying sales tax under protest, and some aren't paying at all.

protestverb

uk   /prəʊˈtest/ us   /prəˈtest/
[I or T] to say or do something to show that you are against something: protest about/at sth Shareholders of the telecoms company are being urged to protest about a £10million bonus given to the chief executive.protest against sth Local entrepreneurs banded together and called a strike to protest against an increase in local taxes. US protest a proposal/decision
to say very forcefully that something is true: protest that Industry lobbyists protest that the charges on small loans would drive lenders out of business.
(Definition of protest from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“protest” in Business English

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