put Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “put” - English Dictionary

Definition of "put" - American English Dictionary

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putverb

 us   /pʊt/ (present participle putting, past tense and past participle put)

put verb (MOVE)

[T always + adv/prep] to move something or someone into the ​statedplace, ​position, or ​direction: She put her ​arm around him. Put ​yourclothes in the ​closet. When you set the ​table, put the ​soupspoons next to the ​knives. She put her ​coffeecup on the ​table. The ​movie was so ​scary that she put her ​hands over her ​eyes.put someone to bed If you put someone to ​bed, you ​dress the ​person in the ​clothesworn for ​sleeping and ​see that the ​person gets into ​bed: I’ll ​call back after I put the ​kids to ​bed.

put verb (WRITE)

[T always + adv/prep] to write down or ​record: Put ​yourname on the ​list if you ​want to go. Put an ​answer in the ​spaceprovided.

put verb (EXPRESS)

[T] to ​express something in words: She ​wanted to ​tell him that she didn’t ​want to ​see him any more, but she didn’t ​know how to put it. He has ​difficulty putting his ​feelings into words. [T] If you put something in a ​particular way, you ​express it that way: To put it ​bluntly, Pete, you’re just no good at the ​job. Dad was ​annoyed, to put it ​mildly.

put verb (CONDITION)

[T] to ​cause something to be in the ​statedcondition or ​situation: Are you ​prepared to put ​yourchildren at ​risk? This puts me in a very ​difficultposition. What put you in such a ​badmood?

put verb (JUDGE)

[T always + adv/prep] to ​judge something or someone in ​comparison with other ​similar things or ​people: I’d put him among the ​top six ​tennisplayers of all ​time. The ​value of the ​painting has been put at $1.5 million. He always puts his ​family first.
(Definition of put from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "put" - British English Dictionary

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putverb

uk   us   /pʊt/ (present participle putting, past tense and past participle put)

put verb (MOVE)

A1 [T + adv/prep] to ​move something or someone into the ​statedplace, ​position, or ​direction: Where have you put the ​keys? Put ​yourclothes in the ​cupboard. He put ​salt into the ​sugarbowl by ​mistake. She put her ​bag on the ​table. She put her ​hands over her ​eyes. I put my ​arm around him to ​comfort him. We always put the ​cat out (= ​outside the ​house) at ​night. Every ​night, she puts out her ​clothes (= ​takes them from where they are ​kept so that they are ​ready) for the next ​day. If we put the ​chairs a little ​closer together (= ​move them ​nearer to each other), we should be ​able to get another one around the ​table. If you put together (= ​mix)yellow and ​bluepaint you get ​green. The ​prisoners were put up against (= ​moved into a ​position next to) a ​wall and ​shot.
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put verb (WRITE)

A2 [T + adv/prep] to write something: She puts her ​name in all her ​books. Put an X next to the ​name of the ​candidate you ​want to ​vote for. I've put the ​date of the ​party down in my ​diary. He ​asked me to put my ​objections (down) on ​paper. It was an ​interestingarticle but I ​wish they'd put in more ​information (= ​included more ​information) about the ​costs.
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put verb (EXPRESS)

C2 [T usually + adv/prep] to ​express something in words: She ​wanted to ​tell him that she didn't ​want to ​see him any more, but she didn't ​know how to put it. We're going to have to ​work very hard, but as Chris so ​succinctly put it, there's no ​gain without ​pain. Why do you always have to put things so ​crudely? Has everyone had a ​chance to put ​theirpoint of ​view?put a price/value/figure on sth to say what you ​think the ​price or ​value of something is: The ​agent has put a ​price of £720,000 on ​ourhouse. You can't put a ​value on ​friendship (= say what it is ​worth).to put it bluntly, simply, mildly, etc. used to ​describe the way you are ​expressing an ​event or ​opinion: To put it ​bluntly, you're going to have to ​improve. He was ​annoyed, to put it ​mildly (= he was very ​annoyed).
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put verb (CONDITION)

B2 [T] to ​cause someone or something to be in the ​statedcondition or ​situation: Are you ​prepared to put ​yourchildren at ​risk? This puts me in a very ​difficultposition. What has put you in such a ​badmood? This ​election is a ​chance for the ​country to put a new ​government in (= ​elect a new ​government). It's ​broken into so many ​pieces, it'll be ​impossible to put it back together again (= ​repair it). Let's give her the ​chance to put her ​ideas into ​practice. The ​terrorists were put on ​trial (= ​theircase was ​judged in a ​court of ​law) six ​years after the ​bombing. Wilson was put out (of the ​competition) (= was ​defeated) by Clarke in the second round. [+ adj] How much did it ​cost to have the ​television put right (= ​repaired)? I ​originallythought he was Australian, but he ​soon put me straight (= ​corrected me) and ​explained he was from New Zealand. I ​know she's gone ​forever, but I just can't put her out of my ​mind/​head (= ​forget her). He's putting me under ​pressure to ​change my ​mind.
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put verb (OPERATION)

[T usually + adv/prep] to ​bring into ​operation; to ​cause to be used: When the ​drugsfailed to ​cure her, she put her faith/​trust inherbalmedicine. The ​school puts a lot of emphasis onteachingchildren to ​read and write. He's putting pressure on me to ​change my ​mind. The ​events of the last few ​weeks have put a ​real strain on him. In the ​story of Sleeping Beauty, the ​wickedfairy puts a spell/​curse (US hex) on the ​babyprincess. You ​know it was ​yourfault, so don't ​try to put the blame on anyone ​else. The ​government is ​expected to put a new tax oncars. The new ​tax will put 15 ​percent onfuelprices (= ​increase them by 15 ​percent). She's never put a ​bet/​money on a ​race before. He put everything he had into (= he used all his ​abilities and ​strength in) the ​finalgame. The more you put into something, the more you get out of it (= the ​harder you ​work at something, the more ​satisfying it is). They put (= ​invested) a lot of ​money into the ​familybusiness. The ​president is ​trying to put through (= ​bring into ​operation)reforms of the country's ​economicsystem. They've got to put an end to/a ​stop totheirfighting (= to ​stopfighting).
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put verb (JUDGE)

[T + adv/prep] to ​judge something or someone in ​comparison with other ​similar things or ​people: I'd put him among the ​top six ​tennisplayers of all ​time. Drama ​critics have put her on a ​level/​par with the ​great Shakespearean ​actresses. He always puts the ​needs of his ​family first/last (= they are the most/least ​important thing to him).

put verb (SAIL)

[I + adv/prep] to ​travel in a ​boat or ​shipacross the ​sea: Our ​mastbroke, so we had to put about (= ​turn round) and ​return to ​port. The ​ship put in at (= ​stopped at) Cape Town for ​freshsupplies. We put to ​sea (= ​beganourjourney by ​sea) at ​dawn.
(Definition of put from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "put" - Business English Dictionary

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putverb

uk   us   /pʊt/ (putting, put, put)
[T] to ​move something into a particular ​place: Can you put the ​file on my ​desk when you've ​finished with it, please? We put the ​money in the ​safe at the end of each day.
[T] to write down or ​recordinformation: Put your ​fullname at the ​top of the ​form. It's a good ​report, but you haven't put in anything about the ​costs. You can ​save a lot of ​time and ​effort by putting your ​accounts on a ​computer.
[T] to ​express something in words: I hate these ​designs, but I don't know how to put it in a tactful way. We're going to have to ​work very hard, but as Chris so succinctly put it, there's no ​gain without pain.
[T] to cause someone or something to be in a particular ​condition or ​situation: put sb in a difficult/awkward/embarrassing, etc. position This puts me in a very difficult ​position.put sth into effect/practice Let's give her the chance to put her ​ideas into ​practice. I don't know what the problem is, but we have two days to put it ​right.put sb under pressure/strain/stress He put me under ​pressure to ​change my mind.put sb out of business/work/a job Unemployment ​benefits for those put out of ​work have been ​extended for six months.
[T] to ​officially begin using something: The ​government is expected to put a new ​tax on ​cars. The ​government put through a ​lawrequiringequalaccess to ​buildings for ​disabledpeople.
[T] to ​judge something or someone in comparison with other similar things or ​people: put sb/sth among sb/sth His four-year ​deal put him among the country's ​highestearners.put sb/sth first/tenth/50th, etc. Washington's ​quarterlyrate of one ​foreclosure for every 436 ​households put it 21st among ​states.
put a price/value/figure on sth to say what you ​think the ​price or ​value of something is: They've put a ​price of €2 million on the ​factory.
to put it bluntly/simply/briefly, etc. to ​express something in a particular way: To put it bluntly, you're going to have to ​improve.

putnoun [C]

uk   us   /pʊt/ FINANCE, STOCK MARKET
→  put option
(Definition of put from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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