put sth back Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Definition of “put sth back” - English Dictionary

"put sth back" in British English

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put sth back

phrasal verb with put uk   us   /pʊt/ verb (present participle putting, past tense and past participle put)
  • (DRINK)

mainly UK informal to ​drink something ​quickly, ​especially a ​largeamount of ​alcohol: He ​regularly puts back six ​pints a ​night - I don't ​know how he does it.
  • (OF CLOCK)

to ​change a ​clock or ​watch to make it show an ​earliertime, for ​example because you are now in a ​part of the ​world where the ​time is different
(Definition of put sth back from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"put sth back" in Business English

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put sth back

phrasal verb with put uk   us   /pʊt/ verb (putting, put, put)
to ​return something to where it belongs: I ​phonedpointing out that there had been no mistake on my ​account and ​demanded that the ​money be put back. Money ​spent on new ​facilities isn't just buried in a ​hole somewhere, it's ​spent on ​construction and put back into the ​economy. Our ​companysponsorslocal sport and arts because we want to put something back into the ​community.
UK to ​arrange for something to ​happen later than originally ​planned: A ​ruling had been expected by the end of April, but has been put back a further month.
to cause a delay in something: The hurricane put back the ​completion of the ​projects.
(Definition of put sth back from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “put sth back”
in Chinese (Simplified) 放回原处, 将…放回原处…
in Turkish eski yerine koymak, yerleştirmek…
in Russian класть на место…
in Chinese (Traditional) 放回原處, 將…放回原處…
in Polish odkładać coś…
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“put sth back” in English

“put sth back” in Business English

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