quote Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of “quote” - English Dictionary

"quote" in American English

See all translations

quoteverb

 us   /kwoʊt/
  • quote verb (REPEAT WORDS)

[I/T] to repeat words that someone else has said or written: [T] She quoted him as saying he couldn’t care less. [I] He illustrated by quoting from Winston Churchill’s speech.
[I/T] If you quote a fact or example, you refer to it to provide proof of something: [T] The judge quoted several cases to support his opinion.
quote, unquote
You say quote or quote, unquote to show you are repeating the words of someone else: He hailed the performance as, quote, an extraordinary achievement. She moved to New York City knowing that that's where she had to live to, quote, unquote, make it in the music world.
  • quote verb (STATE A PRICE)

[T] to state a price or amount that something will cost: The roofer quoted $3000 to fix the roof.
(Definition of quote from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"quote" in British English

See all translations

quoteverb

uk   /kwəʊt/  us   /kwoʊt/
  • quote verb (SAY)

C1 [I or T] to repeat the words that someone else has said or written: He's always quoting from the Bible. "If they're flexible, we're flexible", the official was quoted as saying. She worked, to quote her daughter, "as if there were no tomorrow". Can I quote you on that (= can I repeat to other people what you have just said)?
C1 [T] If you quote a fact or example, you refer to it in order to add emphasis to what you are saying: [+ two objects] Quote me one organization that doesn't have some bad managers.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

quotenoun

uk   /kwəʊt/  us   /kwoʊt/ informal
(Definition of quote from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"quote" in Business English

See all translations

quoteverb

uk   us   /kwəʊt/
[I or T] COMMERCE to tell a customer how much a job, service, or product will cost: quote sb sth A law firm in Washington D.C. quoted me a fee of $25,000 to get the paperwork done.quote for sth Some insurers will even decline to quote for new business if the home is in a risky area.
[T] STOCK MARKET, FINANCE to give the current price of a company's shares or of a currency: The old system allows market makers to quote prices at which they will buy and sell large blocks of shares through all conditions.quote sth at $1.50/£2.25/75p, etc. The British pound was quoted at $1.5117, down from $1.5135 in New York.
[T] UK STOCK MARKET to record a company's name on a stock exchange so that its shares can be traded there: quote sth on sth The Footsie is an average of the share prices of the biggest 100 companies quoted on the stock market.
Compare

quotenoun [C]

uk   us   /kwəʊt/ informal COMMERCE
a statement of how much a job, service, or product will cost: Most quotes are valid for a month. If you already have a UK medical policy, ask for a quote for offshore cover.a quote for (doing) sth The quotes for the building work varied from $15,000 to $70,000.
(Definition of quote from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of quote?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“quote” in Business English

A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
by ,
May 04, 2016
by Kate Woodford We can’t always focus on the positive! This week, we’re looking at the language that is used to refer to arguing and arguments, and the differences in meaning between the various words and phrases. There are several words that suggest that people are arguing about something that is not important. (As you might

Read More 

Word of the Day

galaxy

one of the independent groups of stars in the universe

Word of the Day

trigger warning noun
trigger warning noun
May 02, 2016
a warning that a subject may trigger unpleasant emotions or memories This is not, I should stress, an argument that trigger warnings should become commonplace on campus.

Read More