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Definition of “rail” - English Dictionary

"rail" in American English

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railnoun

us   /reɪl/
  • rail noun (TRAINS)

[C/U] one of the two metal bars fixed to the ground on which trains travel
[C/U] Rail also means railroad: [U] rail transportation [U] Commuter rail and subway lines will be linked.
  • rail noun (ROD)

[C] a straight bar or rod fixed in position, esp. to a wall or to vertical posts, used to enclose something or as a support: The car swerved out of control and crashed through a guard rail on the bridge.

railverb [I always + adv/prep]

us   /reɪl/
to complain angrily: He railed against the injustices of the system.
(Definition of rail from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"rail" in British English

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railnoun

uk   /reɪl/ us   /reɪl/
  • rail noun (TRAINS)

B1 [U] the system of transport that uses trains: Environmentalists argue that more goods should be transported by rail.
[C] one of the two metal bars attached to the ground on which trains travel: A train left/went off the rails and crashed into the bank, killing several passengers.

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  • rail noun (BAR)

C2 [C] a horizontal bar fixed in position, especially to a wall or to vertical posts, used to close something off, as a support, or to hang things on: Will spectators please stay behind the rail? Hold onto the rail so that you don't fall. The (clothes) rail in her wardrobe was crammed full of dresses.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

railverb [I + prep]

uk   /reɪl/ us   /reɪl/ formal
(Definition of rail from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"rail" in Business English

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railnoun [U]

uk   /reɪl/ us   TRANSPORT
transport or travel by train: by rail Brazil transports 30% of its goods by rail. We need more investment in road and rail. Rail travel accounts for less than 1% of the trips we make annually. Road and rail links to the airport are good.
(Definition of rail from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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