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Definition of “raise” - English Dictionary

"raise" in American English

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raiseverb [T]

 us   /reɪz/
  • raise verb [T] (LIFT)

to cause something to be lifted up or become higher: He raised the window shades. Stephie raised her hand to ask the teacher a question.
  • raise verb [T] (BECOME BIGGER)

to cause something to become bigger or stronger; increase: I had to raise my voice to be heard over the noise in the classroom. There are no plans to raise taxes, the president said. I don’t want to raise your hopes too much, but I think the worst of the flooding is over.
  • raise verb [T] (DEVELOP)

to take care of children or young animals until completely grown: They raised a family and now want to enjoy their retirement.
  • raise verb [T] (BRING ABOUT)

to bring something to your attention; cause to be noticed: This raises a number of important issues.
To raise money is to succeed in getting it: I want to start my own business if I can raise enough money.
Idioms

raisenoun [C]

 us   /reɪz/
  • raise noun [C] (SOMETHING BECOMING BIGGER)

an increase in the amount money you earn: She asked her boss for a raise.
(Definition of raise from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"raise" in British English

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raiseverb [T]

uk   /reɪz/  us   /reɪz/
  • raise verb [T] (LIFT)

B1 to lift something to a higher position: Would all those in favour please raise their hands? He raised the window and leaned out. Mary Quant was the first fashion designer to raise hemlines.

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  • raise verb [T] (INCREASE)

B1 to cause something to increase or become bigger, better, higher, etc.: The government plan to raise taxes. I had to raise my voice (= speak more loudly) to make myself heard over the noise. The inspector said that standards at the school had to be raised. Our little chat has raised my spirits (= made me feel happier).

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  • raise verb [T] (EXIST)

B2 to cause to exist: Her answers raised doubts/fears/suspicions in my mind. This discussion has raised many important issues/problems. The announcement raised a cheer/laugh. I want to raise (= talk about) two problems/questions with you. I want to start my own business if I can raise (= obtain) the money/cash/capital/funds.formal The chapel was raised (= built) as a memorial to her son.

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  • raise verb [T] (DEVELOP)

B2 to take care of a person, or an animal or plant, until they are completely grown: Her parents died when she was a baby and she was raised by her grandparents. The lambs had to be raised by hand (= fed milk by people) when their mother died. The farmer raises (= breeds) chickens and pigs. The soil around here isn't good enough for raising (= growing) crops.

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  • raise verb [T] (COMMUNICATE)

to communicate with someone, especially by phone or radio: I've been trying to raise Jack/Tokyo all day.

raisenoun [C]

uk   /reɪz/  us   /reɪz/ US (UK rise)
(Definition of raise from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"raise" in Business English

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raiseverb [T]

uk   us   /reɪz/
to increase the amount, level, or quality of something: The Bank of England was expected to raise the cost of borrowing after higher than expected inflation figures.raise salaries/prices/taxes There is increasing pressure on exporters to raise prices in foreign markets.raise awareness/standards/quality The new government is pledging to raise standards in education.
FINANCE to manage to get money to invest in a business, project, property, etc.: raise capital/funds/money We will raise funds for reconstruction by disposing of assets. The share issue in the coffee company aims to raise €5m from investors eager to invest in ethical concerns. raise a loan/mortgage
to mention something that you are worried or not sure about so that it can be examined and dealt with: raise concerns/doubts/fears The company announced a package of reforms to address concerns raised by shareholders. raise issues/objections/questions
ACCOUNTING to prepare an invoice: The exporter raises an invoice in the usual way on the overseas buyer.
COMMUNICATIONS to make or arrange a phone call, especially to discuss technical help, business, etc.: If you have a technical fault, you can raise a call using the in-house system.

raisenoun [C]

uk   us   /reɪz/ US (UK rise)
HR an increase in salary or wages: A 2% raise for each employee would add $28 million to the overall budget.
(Definition of raise from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“raise” in Business English

A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
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by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

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