Definition of “regret” - English Dictionary

“regret” in British English

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regretnoun [ C or U ]

uk /rɪˈɡret/ us /rɪˈɡret/

B2 a feeling of sadness about something sad or wrong or about a mistake that you have made, and a wish that it could have been different and better:

I left school at 16, but I've had a great life and I have no regrets.
The manager expressed deep regret at/for the number of staff reductions.
We think, much to our regret (= and we are very sorry about this), that we will not be able to visit you next year.
send (sb) your regrets

to send a polite message that you cannot go to a party, etc.:

We did have an invitation, but we had to send Graham our regrets.

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regretverb [ T ]

uk /rɪˈɡret/ us /rɪˈɡret/ -tt-

B1 to feel sorry about a situation, especially something sad or wrong or a mistake that you have made:

Is there anything you've done in your life that you regret?
[ + -ing verb ] I have always regretted not having studied harder at school.
[ + (that) ] formal The council regrets (that) the money to subsidize the youth club is no longer available.
[ + to infinitive ] formal British Airways regret to announce the cancellation of flight BA205 to Madrid.

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(Definition of “regret” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“regret” in American English

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regretverb

us /rɪˈɡret/ -tt-

to feel sorry or unhappy about something you did or were unable to do:

[ T ] He regretted his decision to leave school.
[ + (that) clause ] I regret (that) I didn’t buy more when they were on sale.
[ T ] I’m going to regret eating all those nachos.

fml Regret is also used to express in a polite way that you feel sorry about something:

[ + (that) clause ] My husband regrets (that) he couldn’t be here tonight.
[ + to infinitive ] The weather, I regret to say, is getting worse.

(Definition of “regret” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)