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Definition of “reject” - English Dictionary

"reject" in American English

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rejectverb [T]

us   /rɪˈdʒekt/
to refuse to accept, use, or believe something or someone: The school rejects a third of all applicants.
To reject someone is also to treat someone in a way that shows you do not feel affection for that person: As a child, she had felt rejected by her mother.
medical If your body rejects tissue or an organ that comes from another person, your body has a dangerous physical reaction to it.

rejectnoun [C]

us   /ˈri·dʒekt/
a damaged or faulty object, or a person who has had many jobs because of not being successful at any of them: In desperation the hockey team picked up a 35-year-old reject as a backup goalie.
(Definition of reject from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"reject" in British English

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rejectverb [T]

uk   /rɪˈdʒekt/ us   /rɪˈdʒekt/
B2 to refuse to accept, use, or believe something or someone: The appeal was rejected by the court. Coin-operated machines in England reject euros. The prime minister rejected the suggestion that it was time for him to resign. I applied for a job as a mechanic in a local garage, but I was rejected (= I was not offered the job). The coach rejected him for the first team (= he was not offered a place).
B2 to not give someone the love and attention they want and are expecting from you: When she was sent to boarding school, she felt as though her parents had rejected her.
specialized medical If your body rejects an organ that has been put in during a medical operation, it fails to accept it and tries to attack and destroy it.

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rejectnoun [C]

uk   /ˈriː.dʒekt/ us   /ˈriː.dʒekt/
a product that is damaged or not perfectly made
a person who has not been accepted by an organization or by society: He considered himself to be one of life's rejects.
(Definition of reject from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"reject" in Business English

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rejectverb [T]

uk   /rɪˈdʒekt/ us  
to refuse to accept an idea, suggestion, etc.: The committee will decide whether to accept or reject the offer. reject a suggestion/proposal/argument reject a claim/criticism/allegationreject sth as sth The board rejected the idea as being too risky.
HR, WORKPLACE to decide not to choose someone for a job or for a place on a course of study, etc.: We rejected ten candidates in the first round of interviews. 25% of applicants are rejected because of lack of experience.
COMMERCE to decide that goods cannot be accepted because they are of low quality: Three shipments of beans were rejected because they had traces of illegal pesticides.
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rejectnoun [C]

uk   /ˈriːdʒekt/ us  
COMMERCE something that cannot be accepted because it is of low quality: a factory reject Most of the crowd control drugs tested by the US military were rejects from the pharmaceutical industry.
(Definition of reject from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“reject” in Business English

More meanings of “reject”

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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