release Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “release” - English Dictionary

Definition of "release" - American English Dictionary

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releaseverb [T]

 us   /rɪˈlis/

release verb [T] (MAKE FREE)

to give ​freedom to someone: Agents questioned the men, then released them because they had done nothing ​wrong. If you release a ​device, you move it from a ​lockedposition and ​allow it to move ​freely: She released the ​brake and the ​carrolledforward.

release verb [T] (STOP HOLDING)

to ​drop, or to ​stopcarrying, ​holding, or ​containing something: The ​dogbrought the ​ball back to us but wouldn’t release it. The ​company was ​charged with releasing ​toxicgases into the ​atmosphere.

release verb [T] (MAKE PUBLIC)

to ​let something be ​shown in ​public or made ​available for use: The ​police released a ​drawing of the ​suspect.

releasenoun [C usually sing]

 us   /rɪˈlis/

release noun [C usually sing] (MAKING FREE)

the ​act of giving ​freedom to someone: Diplomatic ​efforts were ​underway to ​secure the release of the two journalists.

release noun [C usually sing] (MAKING PUBLIC)

the ​act of ​letting something be ​shown in ​public or be made ​available for use: The release of the ​movie was ​delayed for several ​months.
(Definition of release from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "release" - British English Dictionary

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releaseverb [T]

uk   us   /rɪˈliːs/

release verb [T] (MAKE FREE)

B2 to give ​freedom or ​freemovement to someone or something: He was released fromprison after ​serving two ​years of a five-year ​sentence. She was ​arrested for ​shoplifting but was released on ​bail (= after ​paying a ​sum of ​money to the ​court).figurative The ​surgery released him from ​years of ​pain. to ​move a ​device from a ​fixedposition to ​allow it to ​movefreely: He released the ​handbrake and the ​carjumpedforwards. to ​fire a ​bomb or a missile (= ​flyingweapon), or to ​allow it to ​fall: The ​plane released ​itsbombs at 10,000 ​feet.C1 to ​allow a ​substance to ​flow out from ​somewhere: Coal ​powerstations release ​sulphurdioxide into the ​atmosphere. Hormones are released fromglands into the ​bloodstream. to ​express a ​feeling that you have been ​trying not to show: He ​punched the ​pillow in an ​effort to release his ​anger.
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release verb [T] (MAKE PUBLIC)

C1 to ​allow something to be ​shown in ​public or to be ​available for use: Police have released a ​picture of the man they ​want to ​question. The ​mayor has released a ​statementexplaining the ​reasons for his ​resignation.B2 If a ​company releases a ​film or ​musicalrecording, it ​allows the ​film to be ​shown in ​cinemas, or makes the ​musicalrecordingavailable for the ​public to ​buy: The band's ​latestalbum will be released next ​week. Indian English to make a ​product, for ​example a ​book, ​available for the ​public to ​buy, often with a ​celebration; launch: The new ​edition of the ​dictionary will be released by the ​educationministerlater this ​month.
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releasenoun

uk   us   /rɪˈliːs/

release noun (MAKING FREE)

C1 [S or U] an ​occasion when someone is ​allowed to ​leaveprison, etc.: Her early release fromprisonled to a ​demonstration.C1 [U] the ​act of ​flowing out from ​somewhere: The ​accidentcaused the release ofradioactivity into the ​atmosphere. [S or U] a ​feeling that you are ​free from something ​unpleasant: I ​noticed a release oftension when he ​left the ​room. After ​years of ​suffering, his ​death came as a ​merciful release.
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release noun (MAKING PUBLIC)

[U] the ​act of making something ​public or ​available for use: There are ​strictrules on the release ofofficialinformation. [C] a written ​statement that gives ​information to be ​broadcast or ​published: The ​companyissued a press release ​announcing the ​appointment of a new ​CEO.B2 [C] a ​musicalrecording that is made ​available for the ​public to ​buy: Her ​latest release, a ​song about ​doomedlove, she ​wrote herself.be on general release UK If a ​film is on ​general release, it is ​available to be ​shown in ​cinemas: The ​latest Disney ​film goes on ​general release next ​month.
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(Definition of release from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "release" - Business English Dictionary

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releaseverb [T]

uk   us   /rɪˈliːs/
COMMUNICATIONS to make ​informationavailable to the ​public: According to a ​study released last week, nearly 250,000 Britons ​emigrated last ​year.release a statement/document/report The ​conservationgroup released a ​reportaccusingpetroleumcompanies of causing widespread ​pollution.release details/figures/findings Figures released by the Council of Mortgage Lenders show that fixed-rate ​products accounted for 78% of ​mortgages in August. Copies of the ​correspondence between the ​attorneys have now been released to the ​media.
COMMERCE to ​start to ​sell a new ​product: Only a very ​smallpercentage of the ​software games released each ​year actually make ​money.release a CD/DVD/movie The ​recordcompany has just released a CD that ​brings together the artist's solo and ​collaborativework.
FINANCE to make ​moneyavailable to be ​spent: A ​spokesman for the ​transportgroup said new ​debtarrangements would release €500 million. Selling their ​home to release the ​equity is some people's only way of ​funding their ​livingexpenses in old age.
PRODUCTION to ​producegases or ​chemical substances as ​part of a ​manufacturing or ​industrialprocess: Many ​industrialprocesses are still releasing great ​quantities of ​carbon dioxide.
to ​officially say that someone no ​longer has a ​job, ​position, or ​responsibility: release sb from sth The ​club has ​agreed to release three of its ​players from ​contract.

releasenoun

uk   us   /rɪˈliːs/
[S or U] COMMERCE the ​act of making a new ​productavailable to ​buy or a new film ​available to see: The album ​sold more than 200,000 ​copies in the week ​following its June 12 release. The movie's release ​date has been ​pushed back six weeks. Sales ​peak when ​retailerstime their ​promotioncampaigns with the release of a box-office ​hit like Star Wars. Throughout the country, ​people have been queuing outside ​stores as they ​anticipate the ​commercial release of the new ​phone.after/on/since release Customers ​purchasing new ​computers have been ​offered a ​freeupgrade to the latest ​operatingsystem on its release.be/go on release A Blu-Ray ​version of the movie is now on ​general release.
[C] COMMERCE a new ​product that is made ​available to ​buy, especially a CD, ​DVD, or a ​piece of ​software: new/recent/latest release Three of the ​major Hollywood film ​studiosagreed to ​sell their older movies - but not new releases - through iTunes™.
[S or U] COMMUNICATIONS the ​act of making ​informationavailable to the ​public: The report's release resulted in ​sharepricesdropping dramatically. A ​temporaryorder was ​granted by the ​judge preventing the release of about 900 ​pages of e-mails.the release of information/reports/figures The rand ​lostground again after the release of worse-than-expected ​gold and ​foreignexchangefigures.
[C] COMMUNICATIONS an ​officialstatement or ​document that is made ​available to the ​public: The city's ​GDP, down 5% to $48.86 ​billion, reflected the ​blowstruck by the earthquake, the ​bureau said in a release. a news/​press releaseissue/put out a release We will not be ​issuing a release on any ​taxincreases until ​work on the ​statebudget for the next ​fiscalyear is complete.
[C or U] PRODUCTION a ​process in which ​gases or ​chemical substances are ​produced as ​part of ​manufacturing or ​industrialprocesses: The ​company said its ​level of ​airemissions would ​stay about the same under the new ​permit, although it did ​acknowledge that the ​permit would ​allow larger releases. Any ​breach of ​safetyregulations and resulting ​damage within a ​reactor could ​lead to a release of radiation.
[S or U] FINANCE the ​act of making ​moneyavailable to be ​spent: release of sth Stock ​marketindexes have ​recorded a ​steadygrowth in anticipation of early release of ​funds by the ​internationaldonoragencies.
[S or U] the ​act of making something ​available to be used: release of sth Crude ​oilprices edged up to $29.66 amid disappointment that ​Europe has ​postponed any release of ​oil from its ​strategicreserves.
(Definition of release from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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