remit Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “remit” - English Dictionary

Definition of "remit" - American English Dictionary

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remitverb [T]

 us   /rɪˈmɪt/ (-tt-) fml
to ​sendmoney to someone: Please remit ​payment by the 15th of the ​month.
(Definition of remit from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "remit" - British English Dictionary

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remitverb [T]

uk   us   /rɪˈmɪt/ (-tt-)

remit verb [T] (REDUCE)

UK specialized law to ​reduce a ​period of ​time that someone must ​spend in ​prison: She has had ​part of her ​sentence remitted. His ​prisonsentence was remitted to two ​years.

remit verb [T] (SEND)

formal to ​sendmoney to someone: He ​worked as a ​builder in Chicago and remitted ​half his ​monthlywage to his ​family in the Philippines. formal to refer a ​matter to someone in ​authority to ​deal with: She remitted the ​case to a new ​tribunal for ​reconsideration.

remitnoun [C usually singular]

uk   us   /ˈriː.mɪt/
the ​area that a ​person or ​group of ​people in ​authority has ​responsibility for or ​control over: The remit of this ​officialinquiry is to ​investigate the ​reasons for the ​accident.
(Definition of remit from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "remit" - Business English Dictionary

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remitnoun [C, usually singular]

uk   /ˈriːmɪt/  us   /riːˈmɪt/ UK
the ​types of ​activity that a ​person or ​organization has responsiblity for: The Treasury's remit has never been more wide-ranging than it is now. As ​independentbroadcasters, it is ​part of our remit to ​cater for ​minorityaudiences and ​promotediversity. Her ​appointment to the ​board comes with a remit tofocus on its ​corporatesocialresponsibility. a narrow/wide remithave a/no remit to do sth The ​Commission had the remit to consider how ​smallcompanies could ​compete in the public-sector ​market.be/fall outside sb's remit Where a ​casefalls outside the ombudsman's remit, the aggrieved ​customer has no alternative but to take the ​company involved to ​court.be/fall within/under sb's remit Many such ​cases will ​fall within the remit of the ​smallclaimscourt. His remit ​includesstrategydevelopment, and ​pricing and ​packagingissues, as well as ​regulatory affairs.

remitverb [T]

uk   us   /rɪˈmɪt/ (-tt-)
FINANCE to ​sendmoney to someone, especially as a ​payment for something: remit sth to sb/sth The British ​parentcompany of a ​multinationalgroup may need to remit ​profits from its ​foreignsubsidiaries to Britain, so that it has enough ​money to ​pay its own ​dividends.remit taxes/proceeds/funds Legislation ​requiresbusinesses to ​collect and remit ​salestax on a six-monthly ​basis.
LAW to ​order a ​legalcase to be dealt with in a different ​court of ​law: be remitted to the court/tribunal The ​case will be remitted to the ​tribunal for ​reconsideration.
LAW to ​statelegally that someone does not have to do something, for ​examplepay a ​debt: The ​fine was ​calculated at £3,500 but was subsequently remitted.
(Definition of remit from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“remit” in Business English

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