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Definition of “rocket” - English Dictionary

"rocket" in American English

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rocketnoun [C]

 us   /ˈrɑk·ɪt/
a ​cylindricaldevicecontainingmaterial that ​explodes, ​sending the ​device through the ​air: The rocket was ​launchedyesterday.

rocketverb [I/T]

 us   /ˈrɑk·ɪt/
to ​travel by rocket, or to ​rise, ​increase, or move very ​quickly: [T] The ​astronauts were rocketed into ​space. [I] A ​train rocketed by. [I] Anna rocketed to ​fame in the late 1980s.
(Definition of rocket from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"rocket" in British English

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rocketnoun

uk   /ˈrɒk.ɪt/  us   /ˈrɑː.kɪt/
  • rocket noun (DEVICE)

B2 [C] a ​large cylinder-shaped ​object that ​moves very ​fast by ​forcing out ​burninggases, used for ​spacetravel or as a ​weapon: They launched a rocket to the ​planetVenus. The ​rebels were firinganti-tank rockets.
[C] (also skyrocket) a ​type of firework that ​flies up into the ​air before ​exploding

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rocketverb [I often + adv/prep]

uk   /ˈrɒk.ɪt/  us   /ˈrɑː.kɪt/ (also skyrocket) informal
to ​riseextremelyquickly or make ​extremelyquickprogress towards ​success: House ​prices in the ​north are rocketing (up). Their ​team rocketed to the ​top of the League. Sharon Stone rocketed tofame in the ​film "Basic Instinct".
(Definition of rocket from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"rocket" in Business English

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rocketnoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈrɒkɪt/
a large cylindrical ​object that ​moves very fast by ​forcing out ​burninggases, and that is used for ​spacetravel or as a weapon: launch/​fire a rocket

rocketverb [I]

uk   us   /ˈrɒkɪt/ (also skyrocket) informal
to ​increase extremely quickly or make extremely quick ​progress towards ​success: Fuel ​prices have rocketed in recent months.rocket up Public ​spending is rocketing up this ​year.rocket to sth Crude ​oilprices rocketed to $40 a ​barrel, ​sendingstockmarketsplunging.
(Definition of rocket from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“rocket” in Business English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
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by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

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