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Definition of “roll” - English Dictionary

"roll" in American English

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rollverb

us   /roʊl/
  • roll verb (MOVE)

[I/T] to move in a direction by turning over and over or by traveling on wheels, or to cause something to move in this way: [I] The coin rolled off the table. [T] I rolled the spare tire around to the side of the car. [I] Tears rolled down his cheeks. Bob rolled over (= turned his body while lying down) onto his stomach.
[I/T] If you roll a car window up or down, you turn a handle or press a button that opens or closes the window.
  • roll verb (FORM ROUNDED SHAPE)

[T] to form something soft into a rounded shape: He rolled the clay into a ball. [M] She rolled up her pants so they wouldn’t get wet.
  • roll verb (SOUND)

[I/T] to make a continuous repeated sound: [I] Thunder rolled in the distance.

rollnoun

us   /roʊl/
  • roll noun (LIST)

[C] an official list of names: a roll of eligible voters
  • roll noun (BREAD)

[C] a small loaf of bread
  • roll noun (MOVEMENT)

[C/U] the movement of something in a direction by turning over and over or by traveling on wheels: [C] You have to allow for the roll of the ball when it lands after you hit it.
  • roll noun (SOUND)

  • roll noun (ROUNDED SHAPE)

[C] a long piece of something that bends, formed into a cylinder: a roll of film/ tape/aluminum foil
[C] A roll is also a rounded mass of something: rolls of fat
Idioms
(Definition of roll from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"roll" in British English

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rollverb

uk   /rəʊl/ us   /roʊl/
  • roll verb (MOVE)

B2 [I or T, usually + adv/prep] to (cause something to) move somewhere by turning over and over or from side to side: The vase rolled off the edge of the table and smashed. The dog rolled over onto its back. I rolled the wheel along the side of the road back to the car.
B2 [I or T, usually + adv/prep] to move somewhere easily and without sudden movements: A tear rolled down his cheek. A wave of cigarette smoke rolled towards me. The piano's on wheels, so we can roll it into the room.
[I] If an aircraft or a ship rolls, it leans to one side and then to the other because of the wind or waves.
[I] If a machine is rolling, it is operating: Just as the television cameras started rolling, it began to pour down with rain.
C2 [T] If you roll your eyes, you move them so that you are looking up, to show that you consider someone or something stupid or silly: When he suggested they should buy a new car, she rolled her eyes in disbelief.

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  • roll verb (TURN OVER)

B1 [T usually + adv/prep] to (cause something to) turn over onto itself to form the shape of a ball or a tube: He rolled the clay into a ball in his hands. As I got closer, the hedgehog rolled itself (up) into a ball.
[T] to make a cigarette by wrapping a piece of paper around some tobacco
[I or T, + adv/prep] to fold over a piece of clothing or material to make it shorter: We rolled back the carpet to see the floorboards.

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  • roll verb (SOUND)

[I] to make a continuous, repeated, deep sound: The drums rolled as the acrobat walked along the tightrope.
[T] If you roll your r's, you pronounce them with your tongue moving quickly and repeatedly against the top of the mouth: When you speak Spanish you roll your r's.

rollnoun

uk   /rəʊl/ us   /roʊl/
  • roll noun (TUBE)

B2 [C] a piece of film, paper, or cloth that is rolled into the shape of a tube: a roll of carpet a toilet roll (= a roll of toilet paper)
[C] If a person or animal has rolls of fat on their body, he, she, or it is very fat: The dog had rolls of fat along its neck.

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  • roll noun (MOVEMENT)

[C] an act of rolling on the ground: The dog went for a roll in the grass.
a roll in the hay humorous
sexual activity that is quick and enjoyable and does not involve serious feelings: I wouldn't sacrifice my marriage for a roll in the hay with a waitress.
[U] The roll of a ship or aircraft is its movement from side to side in the water or air.
(Definition of roll from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"roll" in Business English

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rollverb

uk   /rəʊl/ us  
roll off the assembly/production line
to be produced in a factory: The new vehicles roll off the assembly line in August. The company's first locally made vehicle will roll off the production line within a year.
(Definition of roll from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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