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Definition of “score” - English Dictionary

"score" in American English

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scoreverb [I/T]

 us   /skɔr, skoʊr/
to win or obtain a point or something else that gives you an advantage in a competitive activity, such as a sport, game, or test: [I] Has either team scored yet? [T] The Packers scored a touchdown with two minutes to go in the football game. [T] A student from Gettysburg scored a perfect 1600 points on the college entrance exam. [T] fig. He scored (= obtained) a deal with a recording label two years ago.

scorenoun

 us   /skɔr, skoʊr/
  • score noun (MUSICAL TEXT)

music [C] a piece of written music showing the parts for all the different instruments and voices, or the music written for a movie or other entertainment
  • score noun (MATTER)

[C usually sing] a particular matter among others related to it: I’ll let you have the money, so there’s nothing to worry about on that score.
  • score noun (NUMBER)

[C] (a set or group of) 20: Brandon received cards from scores of (= many) local well-wishers.
  • score noun (POINTS)

[C] the number of points achieved or obtained in a game or other competition: The final score was 103–90. Who’s going to keep score when we play bridge? infml So what’s the score (= what are the facts of this situation), doctor? Is it serious?
(Definition of score from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"score" in British English

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scoreverb

uk   /skɔːr/  us   /skɔːr/
  • score verb (WIN)

B1 [I or T] to win or get a point, goal, etc. in a competition, sport, game, or test: Tennant scored (a goal) in the last minute of the game. In American football, a touchdown scores (= is worth) six points. She scored 18 out of 20 in the spelling test.
[I or T] to succeed in an activity or to achieve something: She has certainly scored (a success) with her latest novel. Nearly every bomb scored a hit.UK You have a lot of patience - that's where you score over (= are better than) your opponents.
[I] UK (US keep score) to record the number of points won by competitors: We need someone to score for tomorrow's match.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • score verb (GET)

[T] US informal to get something: I managed to score a couple of tickets to the World Cup final.
[I or T] slang to get illegal drugs: She tried to score some dope in a nightclub.
[I] slang to have sex with someone that you have usually just met: Did you score last night, then?
  • score verb (MARK)

[T] to make a mark or cut on the surface of something hard with a pointed tool, or to draw a line through writing: If you score the tile first, it will be easier to break.
See also
Phrasal verbs

scorenoun

uk   /skɔːr/  us   /skɔːr/
  • score noun (WIN)

B1 [C] (plural scores) the number of points, goals, etc. achieved in a game or competition: a high/low score Have you heard the latest cricket score? At half time, the score stood at (= was) two all. The final score was 3–0. Could you keep (= record) the score at this afternoon's game?

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • score noun (MUSIC)

[C] (plural scores) a piece of written music showing the parts for all the instruments and voices: an orchestral score
[C] (plural scores) the music written for a film, play, etc.: a film score Rodgers wrote the score for/of/to "Oklahoma!".
  • score noun (TWENTY)

[C usually singular] (plural score) formal 20 or approximately 20: He lived to be three score years and ten (= until he was 70 years old).
by the score formal
in large numbers: People are leaving the organization by the score.
scores [plural]
a lot of things or people: Sean received cards from scores of local well-wishers.
  • score noun (SUBJECT JUST MENTIONED)

on this/that score
C2 about the thing or subject that has just been mentioned: I'll let you have the money, so there's nothing to worry about on that score. "The team has a lot of determination to win," declared the coach. "I have no doubts on that score."
(Definition of score from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"SCORE" in Business English

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SCOREnoun

uk   us   /skɔːr/ SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
abbreviation for Service Corps of Retired Executives: an organization in the US that provides free help and advice to small businesses
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(Definition of SCORE from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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