scrap Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “scrap” - English Dictionary

Definition of "scrap" - American English Dictionary

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scrapverb [T]

 us   /skræp/ (-pp-)

scrap verb [T] (THROW AWAY)

to get ​rid of something no ​longeruseful or ​wanted: Over 60% of all Georgians ​want to ​keep the ​presentflag and only 29% ​want to scrap it.

scrapnoun

 us   /skræp/

scrap noun (MATERIALS)

[U] old or used ​material, esp. ​metal, that has been ​collected in one ​place, often in ​order to be ​treated so that it can be used again: He was ​charged with ​stealingcopper tubing, which he then ​sold as scrap ​metal.

scrap noun (SMALL PIECE)

[C] a ​small and often ​irregularpiece of something, or a ​smallamount of something: He ​jotted it down on a scrap of ​paper. [pl] She ​picked up scraps of ​information about her husband’s ​whereabouts, but nothing ​definite.
(Definition of scrap from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "scrap" - British English Dictionary

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scrapverb

uk   us   /skræp/ (-pp-)

scrap verb (THROW AWAY)

C2 [T] to not ​continue with a ​system or ​plan: They're ​considering scrapping the ​tax and ​raising the ​money in other ​ways. We scrapped ​our plans for a ​trip to France.C2 [T] to get ​rid of something that is no ​longeruseful or ​wanted, often using ​itsparts in new ​ways: Hundreds of ​nuclearweapons have been scrapped.

scrap verb (ARGUMENT)

[I] to have a ​fight or an ​argument

scrapnoun

uk   us   /skræp/

scrap noun (METAL)

C2 [U] oldcars and ​machines or ​pieces of ​metal, etc. that are not now ​needed but have ​parts that can be used to make other things: scrap ​iron/metal We ​soldouroldcar for scrap.

scrap noun (SMALL PIECE)

C2 [C] a ​smallpiece of something or a ​smallamount of ​information: Do you have a scrap ofpaper I could write on? I've ​read every scrap of ​information I can ​find on the ​subject. There's not a scrap of (= no)evidence to ​suggest that he ​committed the ​crime.scraps [plural] smallpieces of ​food that have not been ​eaten and are usually ​thrown away: We give all ​our scraps to ​ourcat.

scrap noun (ARGUMENT)

[C] a ​fight or ​argument, ​especially a ​quick, ​noisy one about something not ​important: A ​couple of ​kids were having a scrap in the ​street.
(Definition of scrap from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "scrap" - Business English Dictionary

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scrapverb [T]

uk   us   /skræp/ (-pp-)
to decide not to continue with an ​activity or ​plan: The ​bank has scrapped its ​plans for a ​propertydivision.
to get rid of something that is no ​longer useful or wanted, especially so that its ​parts can be used: The ​car would have ​cost so much to ​repair that I decided to scrap it.

scrapnoun [U]

uk   us   /skræp/ COMMERCE
old ​material, especially metal, that can be ​sold and used again: scrap metalsend/use sth for scrap The ​buildingmaterials were ​sent for scrap. a scrap ​dealer
(Definition of scrap from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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