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Definition of “seal” - English Dictionary

"seal" in American English

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sealnoun [C]

us   /sil/
  • seal noun [C] (ANIMAL)

a large, fish-eating mammal that has very thick fur and lives in the sea: Seals are sometimes hunted for their valuable fur.
  • seal noun [C] (OFFICIAL MARK)

an official mark on a document which shows that it is legal or actually what it claims to be: Diplomas are stamped with the state seal.
A seal of approval means that something has been proven to be good or is very pleasing: My brother’s girlfriend got my mom’s seal of approval.
  • seal noun [C] (COVERING)

anything that prevents the escape of liquid or gas from a container or pipe: The oil seal broke, and all the oil leaked from the engine. Don’t use that jar of baby food if the seal is broken.

sealverb [T]

us   /sil/
  • seal verb [T] (CLOSE)

to close a container or opening, or to prevent the escape of a liquid or gas from something: Rubber seals jars tightly. He sealed the envelope and put a stamp on it. [M] Broiling with high heat seals in the flavor of the meat. [M] The police sealed off the area (= prevented people from entering it).
If official documents are sealed, they cannot be seen or are not available to the public.
  • seal verb [T] (APPROVE)

to formally approve an agreement: They sealed the agreement with their signatures.
(Definition of seal from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"seal" in British English

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sealnoun [C]

uk   /siːl/ us   /siːl/
  • seal noun [C] (ANIMAL)

B2 a large mammal that eats fish and lives partly in the sea and partly on land or ice

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  • seal noun [C] (MARK)

an official mark on a document, sometimes made with wax, that shows that it is legal or has been officially approved: The lawyer stamped the certificate with her seal.

sealverb [T]

uk   /siːl/ us   /siːl/
  • seal verb [T] (COVERING)

C2 to close an entrance or container so that nothing can enter or leave it
to cover a surface with a special liquid to protect it: This floor has just been sealed (with varnish), so don't walk on it!
C2 to close a letter or parcel by sticking the edges together: Seal the package (up) with tape. He sealed (down) the envelope and put a stamp on it.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • seal verb [T] (MARK)

to make an agreement more certain or to approve it formally: The two leaders sealed their agreement with a handshake.
(Definition of seal from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"seal" in Business English

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sealnoun [C]

uk   /siːl/ us  
an official mark on a document, sometimes made with wax, that shows that it is legal or has been officially approved: The documents were marked with the official seal.
a thin piece of paper or plastic that covers the opening of a container and has to be broken before the contents can be used: The seal on the bottle was broken.
something fixed around the edge of an opening to prevent liquid or gas flowing through it: A video showed cracked seals and leaking water inside the coal mine.
under seal
LAW if something is under seal, it cannot be seen, copied, or taken away: His file is currently under seal.
See also

sealverb [T]

uk   /siːl/ us  
to make an agreement more certain or to approve it formally: seal sth with sth The loans are typically sealed with handshakes.
to close an entrance or container so that nothing can enter or leave it: The doors are sealed.
to cover a surface with a special liquid in order to protect it: seal sth with sth The office floors were sealed with varnish.
to close a letter or parcel by sticking the edges together: seal down sth Seal down the envelope.
(Definition of seal from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“seal” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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