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Definition of “seize” - English Dictionary

"seize" in American English

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seizeverb [T]

us   /siz/
to take something quickly and hold it: He seized her arm to lead her through the crowd. fig. While she was distracted, I seized the opportunity to take a cookie.
Seize can also mean to take by force: Rebel forces seized control of six towns.
If police or other officials seize something, they take possession of it by legal authority: The goods that were seized had been hidden in a shipment of paint.
(Definition of seize from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"seize" in British English

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seizeverb

uk   /siːz/ us   /siːz/
B2 [T] to take something quickly and keep or hold it: I seized his arm and made him turn to look at me. He seized the chance/opportunity of a free flight with both hands (= with eagerness or enthusiasm).
C2 [T] to take using sudden force: The rebels have seized ten soldiers to use as hostages. Political instability helped the army to seize power. Troops yesterday seized control of the broadcasting station.
[T] If the police or other officials seize something, they take possession of it with legal authority: Customs officers at Heathrow have seized 60 kilos of heroin.
[usually passive] If a strong emotion or pain seizes you, you feel it suddenly: I was suddenly seized by/with a feeling of great insecurity and loneliness.

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(Definition of seize from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"seize" in Business English

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seizeverb [T]

uk   /siːz/ us  
LAW if the police or government seizes property or assets, they take possession of them because they are illegal, or because the owner owes money: Customs agents last year seized $14 million in counterfeit electronics goods at the nation's ports. seize assets/property
US LAW, GOVERNMENT if the government or other official authority seizes a company, they stop it from trading because of illegal activity or debts: The government has threatened to seize any business that does not sell goods at the advertised price.
to take advantage of something that is available: seize a challenge/opportunity A Malaysian tycoon seized the chance to bid for the company, and won. By having a contract already prepared, you may be able to seize the initiative in negotiations.
to take control of something, especially when others are trying to stop you: seize control/power Disgruntled shareholders tried to oust the board and seize control of the company. In finance, telecoms, media, and technology, there is thought to be a rare opportunity to seize global market share.
(Definition of seize from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“seize” in Business English

Watching the detectorists
Watching the detectorists
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May 31, 2016
by Colin McIntosh You could be forgiven for thinking that old-fashioned hobbies that don’t involve computers have fallen out of favour. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, the internet has made it easier for people with specialist hobbies from different corners of the world to come together to support one another

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