Definition of “send” - English Dictionary

“send” in British English

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sendverb [ T ]

us uk /send/ sent, sent

send verb [ T ] (POST/EMAIL)

A1 to cause something to go from one place to another, especially by post or email:

We'll send it by post/airmail/sea.
Could you send a reply to them as quickly as possible?
The news report was sent by satellite.
She sent a message with John to say that she couldn't come.
They sent her flowers for her birthday.
Maggie sends her love and hopes you'll feel better soon.

More examples

  • We will send you written confirmation of our offer shortly.
  • If you send it airmail, it'll be very expensive.
  • Please send this letter by express delivery.
  • I'll send you my email address once I'm online.
  • I've sent my CV to a few companies in the region.
  • Please send a covering letter with your application form.

send verb [ T ] (CAUSE TO GO)

B2 to cause or order someone to go and do something:

[ + to infinitive ] We're sending the kids to stay with my parents for a couple of weeks.
The commander has asked us to send reinforcements.
They've sent their son (away) to boarding school.
He was trying to explain but she became impatient and sent him away (= told him to leave).

More examples

  • I've sent Milly down to the shops to get some bread.
  • I sent him into the house to get some glasses.
  • They send their kids to private schools.
  • They've sent troops into the region.
  • His teacher sent him out of the room for swearing.

send verb [ T ] (CAUSE TO HAPPEN)

C2 to cause someone or something to do a particular thing, or to cause something to happen:

The explosion sent the crowd into a panic.
Watching television always sends me to sleep.
[ + adj ] UK His untidiness sends her crazy/mad/wild.
[ + -ing verb ] The announcement of the fall in profits sent the company's share price plummeting (= caused it to go down a lot).
The draught from the fan sent papers flying all over the room.

More examples

  • His voice could send me to sleep.
  • This job is going to send me nuts.
  • The news sent the company's stock diving, dropping 10 percent.
  • Speculation alone has sent the company's shares up from 304p to 316p.
  • This then sent interest rates soaring.

(Definition of “send” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“send” in American English

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sendverb [ T ]

us /send/ past tense and past participle sent /sent/

send verb [ T ] (HAVE DELIVERED)

to cause something to go or be taken somewhere without going yourself:

Send a letter to my office.
I like to send e-mail to my friends.

send verb [ T ] (MAKE SOMEONE GO)

to cause or arrange for someone to leave or go:

The UN sent relief workers to the region.
My parents want to send me back to Argentina when I finish my studies.
Who can afford to send their kids to college these days?

send verb [ T ] (MAKE SOMETHING MOVE)

to make something move quickly by force:

Wind sent clouds skittering across the sky.

send verb [ T ] (CAUSE TO HAPPEN)

to cause someone to feel or behave in a particular way, or to cause something to happen:

Final exams always send me into a panic.

(Definition of “send” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

“send” in Business English

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sendverb [ T ]

uk /send/ us sent, sent

COMMUNICATIONS to cause something to go from one place to another, especially by mail, email, etc.:

send sth to sth The schools collect used cell phones and send them to the phone recycling company.
send sb sth Could you send them a reply as quickly as possible?

to cause or order someone to go and do something:

send sb to sth They were sent to India for work.
send sb to do sth She's been sent from Head Office to sort out this mess.
send sb on a course/errand/placement

to cause someone or something to do a particular thing, or to cause something to happen:

send sth higher/up/through the roof Eventually demand outstrips supply, sending prices through the roof.

(Definition of “send” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)