set Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “set” - English Dictionary

Definition of "set" - American English Dictionary

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setverb

 us   /set/

set verb (PUT)

[T always + adv/prep] (present participle setting, past tense and past participle set) to put something in a ​particularplace or ​position: Set the ​box on ​its end. Our ​house is set back from the ​road. [T always + adv/prep] (present participle setting, past tense and past participle set) If you set something down, you put it on a ​surface: [M] She set down her teacup and ​leanedforward. [T always + adv/prep] (present participle setting, past tense and past participle set) If you set a ​story in a ​particularplace or ​time, the ​eventshappen then or there: Banks’s ​novel is set in the ​years before the Civil War.

set verb (CAUSE A CONDITION)

(present participle setting, past tense and past participle set) to ​cause someone or something to be in a ​particularcondition, or to ​begin doing something: [T] He ​carelesslydropped a ​match and set the ​grass on ​fire. [T] His ​remarks set me ​thinking. [L] The wildness in her ​paintings is what sets them ​apart. [+ to infinitive] With the ​deadline only a few ​weeks away, I set to ​workright away.

set verb (ARRANGE)

[T] (present participle setting, past tense and past participle set) to ​arrange or ​adjust something so it is ​ready to ​work or be used: I’ve set the ​clock to ​daylightsavingstime. To get ​rid of ​mice, set a ​trap – or get a ​cat. My ​job is to set the ​table before ​dinner (= ​arrange the ​plates, ​utensils, etc.).

set verb (ESTABLISH)

[T] (present participle setting, past tense and past participle set) to ​establish a ​pattern or ​example to ​follow: Parents should ​try to set a good ​example. The ​governorwants to set ​spendinglimits. She set a new ​worldrecord at the Wannamaker ​Games.

set verb (BECOME FIXED)

[I/T] (present participle setting, past tense and past participle set) to ​cause something to ​becomefixed or ​firm: [T] Have they set a ​date for the ​weddingyet? [I] Glue that sets ​quickly makes it ​easier to ​repair things. [T] The ​old man’s ​face was set in a ​continualscowl. [I/T] (present participle setting, past tense and past participle set) If you have ​yourhair set, you have it ​arranged while it is ​wet so that it will ​stay in a ​particularstyle when it is ​dry. [I/T] (present participle setting, past tense and past participle set) If a ​stone is set, it is ​fixed in a ​piece of ​jewelry: [T] The ​bluestone was set in a ​goldring. [I/T] (present participle setting, past tense and past participle set) When a ​brokenbone is set, it is ​kept in a ​fixedposition so that it can ​heal.

set verb (MOVE DOWN)

[I] (present participle setting, past tense and past participle set) (esp. of the ​sun or ​moon) to ​sink in the ​sky until it cannot be ​seen: The ​sun sets with a ​great show of ​color.

setnoun

 us   /set/

set noun (PLAY BACKGROUND)

[C] something ​built or put together to ​represent a ​place where the ​actionhappens in a ​play or ​movie: The set ​looks just like a ​realsubwaycar.

set noun (GROUP)

[C] a ​group of things that ​belong together or are used together: a ​chess set a ​number set She has a ​strange set of ​symptoms. [C] A set is also a ​group of ​people who have ​similarinterests and ​spendtime together: the golf-playing set [C] In ​tennis, a set is a ​group of ​games between the same competitors: The ​match was over ​quickly, four sets to two.

set noun (TELEVISION)

[C] a ​television: I ​walked in the ​room and ​turned off the set.

set noun (POSITION)

[C/U] a ​position or an ​arrangement, esp. of the ​hair or ​body: [U] I could ​tell from the set of his ​jaw that he was ​angry. [C] Could you give my ​hair a set like the one in the ​picture in this ​magazine?

setadjective [not gradable]

 us   /set/

set adjective [not gradable] (READY)

with everything ​arranged; ​ready: [+ to infinitive] Katy is set to go to ​college in ​September. Is everything all set for the ​party?

set adjective [not gradable] (FIXED)

fixed or ​firm: There wasn’t a set ​time for us to get there. If you are set on something, you have ​firmlydecided about it: HMOs are good if you aren’t set on one ​specificdoctor.
(Definition of set from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "set" - British English Dictionary

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setverb

uk   us   /set/ (present participle setting, past tense and past participle set)

set verb (POSITION)

B2 [T usually + adv/prep] to put something in a ​particularplace or ​position: He set a ​vase of ​flowers on the ​table. The ​campsite is set in the ​middle of a ​pineforest. Our ​house is set back from the ​road.B1 [T usually + adv/prep] If a ​story, ​film, etc. is set in a ​particulartime or ​place, the ​action in it ​happens in that ​time or ​place: "​West Side Story" is set in New York City in the late 1950s.
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set verb (CONDITION)

B2 [T] to ​cause something or someone to be in the ​statedcondition or ​situation: It is ​believed that the ​building was set alight/​ablaze/on ​firedeliberately. The new ​director has set a lot of ​changes in ​motion in ​ourdepartment. [+ adj] After ​years in ​prison, the men who had ​wrongfully been ​foundguilty of the ​bombing were ​finally set free. If I've made a ​mistake, then it's up to me to set it right (= ​correct it).set sb/sth doing sth to ​cause someone or something to ​start doing something: His ​remarks set me ​thinking. The ​thunderstorm set the ​radiocrackling.set sb to work to give someone ​work to do: I was set to ​workdusting the ​bookshelves.
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set verb (ESTABLISH)

B2 [T] to ​establish or ​decide something: The ​school has been ​criticized for ​failing to set high standards for ​itsstudents. The ​committee has set new limits on ​spending. Lewis has set a new ​world record. The court's ​decision has set a ​legal precedent. Parents should set a good example to ​theirchildren. He's set himself the goal/​target of making his first million by the ​time he's 30.
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set verb (GET READY)

B2 [T] to get something ​ready so that it comes into ​operation or can be used: [+ to infinitive] The ​heating is set to come on at 5 p.m. Have you set up the ​DVDplayer? I usually set my ​watch by the ​time on the ​computer. He set the ​alarm for 7 a.m. Will you set the ​table (= put ​plates, ​knives, ​forks, etc. on it ​ready for use), ​please? [T] to put ​furniture and other things on a ​stage so that it ​represents the ​time and the ​place in which the ​action of a ​play, ​film, or ​televisionprogramme is going to ​happen: During the ​interval the ​stage was set for the second ​act.
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set verb (FIX)

B1 [T] to ​fix or make ​certain: Has a date/​time been set for the ​meetingyet? The price of the ​house has been set at €425,000.set into sth/be set with sth If a preciousstone is set in/into a ​piece of ​jewellery, or a ​piece of ​jewellery is set with a preciousstone, the ​stone is ​fixedfirmly to the ​piece of ​jewellery: a ​goldring with a ​diamond set into it a ​brooch set with ​rubies and ​pearls [T] When a ​doctor sets a ​brokenbone, he or she puts it into the ​rightposition so that it will heal. [I] When a ​brokenbone sets, it heals in a ​particularposition. [T] If you have ​yourhair set, you have it ​arranged while it is ​wet so that it will be in a ​particularstyle when it is ​dry. [T] If you set a ​part of ​yourbody, you ​tighten the ​muscles around it in ​order to show that you are ​determined about something: "I'm never going back to him," she said, setting her jawfirmly. His ​face was set in ​determination. [I] If a ​liquid or ​softmaterial sets, it ​becomesfirm or hard: Leave the ​jelly in the ​fridge to set. Don't ​walk on the ​concrete until it has set.
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set verb (GIVE WORK)

B2 UK (US assign) [T] to give someone a ​piece of ​schoolwork or ​homework to do: My ​scienceteacher always sets a lot of ​homework. What ​books have been set for this ​term? [+ two objects] What ​homework have you been set for the ​holidays? [T] to give someone a ​particulartask to do: Harry set them to ​workpainting the ​walls. [+ two objects] We set the ​kids the ​task of ​clearing the ​snow from the ​drive.

set verb (MUSIC)

[T] to write or ​providemusic for a ​poem or other words so that they can be ​sung: poems set to ​music

set verb (SUN)

B1 [I] (of the ​sun, ​moon, or ​planets) to go down below the horizon (= the ​line at which the ​earthseems to ​join the ​sky): We ​sat on the ​beach and ​watched the ​sun set. The setting ​suncastlongshadowsacross the ​lawn.
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setnoun

uk   us   /set/

set noun (GROUP)

A2 [C] a ​group of ​similar things that ​belong together in some way: We ​bought Charles and Mandy a set ofcutlery as a ​weddingpresent. I always ​keep a ​tool set in the back of my ​car. The ​doctor said that he hadn't ​seen this ​particular set ofsymptoms before. We need to ​establish a new set ofpriorities.A2 [C] a ​number of ​objects or ​pieces of ​equipmentneeded for a ​particularactivity, ​especiallyplaying a ​game: a ​chess/​train/​chemistry set [C] specialized mathematics In ​mathematics, a set is a ​group of ​objects with ​statedcharacteristics. [C, + sing/pl verb] a ​group of ​people who have ​similarinterests and ​ways of ​living: the ​fashionable set She's got in with a very ​arty set.
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set noun (FILM/PLAY)

B2 [C] the ​place where a ​film or ​play is ​performed or ​recorded, and the ​pictures, ​furniture, etc. that are used: a ​movie set a ​stage set a set ​designer They first ​met on the set of "Star Wars".
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set noun (PART)

B2 [C] a ​part of a ​game of ​tennis or volleyball: They ​won in straight sets (= they ​won every set).C2 [C] a ​musicalperformance that ​formspart of a concert, ​especially one of ​popmusic or jazz: The band's ​opening set ​lasted 45 ​minutes.
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set noun (POSITION)

the set of sth the ​position in which you ​hold a ​part of ​yourbody: I could ​tell from the set of his ​jaw that he was ​angry. [C] the ​act of having ​yourhair set: a shampoo and set

set noun (TELEVISION)

[C] old-fashioned a ​television: We need a new television set.

setadjective

uk   us   /set/

set adjective (READY)

C1 [after verb] ready and ​prepared: Shall we go now - is everyone set? Is everything all set for the ​party? At the ​start of the ​race, the ​starter said "On ​yourmarks, get set, go". We were just getting set toleave when Ben said he had something ​important to ​tell us. [after verb] likely or in a ​suitablecondition: He ​looks set tobecomeworldchampion again this ​year.

set adjective (SAME)

C2 always the same, never ​changing: My ​parents say I have to be ​home by a set ​time.UK The ​restaurant does a set ​lunch (= a ​meal which is ​offered at a ​fixedprice, but with little or no ​choice about what you have to ​eat) on Sundays. The ​receptionist had a ​bright set ​smile on his ​face, but I could ​tell that he was ​bored. My ​father has very set ​opinions/​views on the ​matter.set expression/phrase a phrase in which the words are always used in the same ​order

set adjective (STUDY)

[before noun] UK a set ​book is one that must be ​studied for a ​particularcourse: The ​students are ​reading "​Lord of the Flies" as one of ​their set books/​texts this ​year.
(Definition of set from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "set" - Business English Dictionary

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setverb

uk   us   /set/ (setting, set, set)
[T] to ​arrange or decide on something: set a date/time Have you set a ​time for the next ​meeting?set a price/rate Individual ​franchises set their own ​prices.set sth at sth The ​initialannualbonusrate has been set at 6.75%. Have they set a ​deadline for ​applications?set a limit (on sth) The ​government has set new ​limits on ​spending. The ​state should ​look for a better way to set ​annualsalaries. We must continue to set ​clearpriorities.
[T] to ​state a ​goal or ​standard that ​people should ​try to ​achieve: set a ​goal/​target/​standard When it comes to ​safety, we will set high ​standards and ​enforce them.
[T] to give someone a ​task or ​piece of ​work to do, or tell them what they must ​achieve: set sb sth She was set the ​task of looking for ways to ​cutcosts.set sb a goal/target/challenge Analysts said the ​bank had set itself a tough ​target of ​increasing its ​revenues by 6% ​per annum.
set up shop informal COMMERCE to ​start a new ​business: They ​left for Switzerland and set up ​shop in Geneva.

setnoun

uk   us   /set/
a ​group of similar things that belong together in some way: a set of sth We have ​laid out a set of ​principles to ​helpleaderstranslate their ​values into ​actions.
See also

setadjective

uk   us   /set/
[before noun] fixed or never ​changing: a set ​price/​amount There is no set ​date for the announcement.
[after verb] ready or likely to ​happen: be set to do sth Fears that ​interestrates are set to ​rise have ​knockedstockmarkets around the ​world. Two new ​factories are set to ​open next ​year.be set for sth The ​euro could ​even be set for a rapid ​recovery.
(Definition of set from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“set” in Business English

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