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Definition of “show” - English Dictionary

"show" in American English

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showverb

us   /ʃoʊ/
  • show verb (MAKE SEEN)

[T] past tense showed, past participle shown /ʃoʊn/ to cause or allow something to be seen: You should show that rash to your doctor. These trees show the effects of acid rain. He’s starting to show his age.
  • show verb (EXPRESS)

[T] past tense showed, past participle shown /ʃoʊn/ to express your feelings or opinion by your actions or words: I do not know how to show my thanks for all your help. He is a scrappy lawyer and shows no mercy to any opponent.
  • show verb (EXPLAIN)

[T] past tense showed, past participle shown /ʃoʊn/ to explain something to someone by helping to do it or by giving instructions or examples to copy: [+ question word] The diagram shows how to fit the pieces together.
  • show verb (PROVE)

[T] past tense showed, past participle shown /ʃoʊn/ to make something clear or prove something to be true: Your writing shows you can be a good writer. He has shown himself to be unreliable.
  • show verb (BE NOTICEABLE)

[I/T] past tense showed, past participle shown /ʃoʊn/ to be able to be seen or noticed, or to make something noticeable: [I] I’ve been working for hours, and I’ve got nothing to show for it.
  • show verb (LEAD)

[T] past tense showed, past participle shown /ʃoʊn/ to lead someone somewhere or to point out something: Could you show me the way to the post office? Show me which cake you want.
  • show verb (RECORD)

[T] past tense showed, past participle shown /ʃoʊn/ to record or express an amount, number, or measurement: My barometer shows a change in the weather is coming.
  • show verb (APPEAR)

[I] to appear at a gathering or event: Jenny said she'd be here, but she never showed.
  • show verb (MAKE PUBLIC EVENT)

[I/T] past tense showed, past participle shown /ʃoʊn/ to make an artist's work available for the public to see: [T] This gallery is a place where young artists can show their work.
[I/T] past tense showed, past participle shown /ʃoʊn/ To show a movie is to offer it for viewing in a movie theater or on television: [T] That channel often shows foreign films.

shownoun

us   /ʃoʊ/
  • show noun (ENTERTAINMENT)

[C] a performance in a theater, a movie, or a television or radio program: a stage/talk show
  • show noun (PUBLIC EVENT)

[C] an event at which the public can view a particular collection of things: a flower show a fashion show
  • show noun (ACTIVITY)

[U] infml an activity, business, or organization, considered in relation to who is managing it: Who will run the show when the boss retires?
  • show noun (APPEARANCE)

[C/U] an appearance of something that is not really sincere or real: [C] Ray made a show of reaching for his wallet. [U] Does this fireplace work or is it just for show? [U] Half for show and half in real anger, I stood up and shouted, “I'm not your friend!”
(Definition of show from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"show" in British English

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showverb

uk   /ʃəʊ/ us   /ʃoʊ/ showed, shown
  • show verb (MAKE SEEN)

A1 [T] to make it possible for something to be seen: [+ two objects] Let me show you this new book I've just bought. On this map, urban areas are shown in grey. You ought to show that rash to your doctor. [+ obj + question word ] Why won't you show me what's in your hand? [+ obj + -ing verb ] The secretly filmed video shows the prince and princess kissing. These photographs show the effects of the chemical on the trees. He began to show signs of recovery. "This is a Victorian gold coin." "Is it? Show me (= allow me to see it)."

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  • show verb (RECORD)

B1 [T] to record or express a number or measurement: The right-hand dial shows the temperature, and the left-hand one shows the air pressure. The company showed a loss of $2 million last year. The latest crime figures show a sharp rise in burglaries.

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  • show verb (EXPLAIN)

B1 [T] to explain something to someone, by doing it or by giving instructions or examples: [+ question word] Can you show me how to set the DVD player? This dictionary contains many examples that show how words are actually used. Could you show me the way to the bus station?

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  • show verb (PROVE)

B2 [T] to prove something or make the truth or existence of something known: She has shown herself (to be) a highly competent manager. His diaries show him to have been an extremely insecure person. [+ (that)] The diaries show (that) he was very insecure. Show me (that) I can trust you. [+ question word] Our research has shown (us) how little we know about this disease.

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  • show verb (EXPRESS)

B2 [T] to express ideas or feelings using actions or words: He finds it difficult to show affection. She showed enormous courage when she rescued him from the fire. [+ two objects] You should show your parents more respect/show more respect to your parents.

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  • show verb (NOTICEABLE)

C1 [I] to be easy to see or notice: "Oh no, I've spilled red wine on my jacket!" "Don't worry, it doesn't show." Whatever she's thinking, she never lets it show. I've painted over the graffiti twice, but it still shows through. The drug does not show up in blood tests because it is effective in very small quantities. When we moved in, the house hadn't been decorated for 20 years, and it showed.
See also
show your age
to look as old as you really are: Recently, he's really starting to show his age.

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  • show verb (PUBLIC EVENT)

[T] to make an artist's work available for the public to see: Our aim is to make it easier for young unknown artists to show their work.
[I or T] If a cinema or television station shows a film or programme, or if a film or programme is showing somewhere, you can see it there: It's the first time this movie has been shown on television. Now showing at a cinema near you!

shownoun

uk   /ʃəʊ/ us   /ʃoʊ/
  • show noun (ENTERTAINMENT)

A2 [C] a theatre performance or a television or radio programme that is entertaining rather than serious: a radio/television/stage show a quiz/game show Why don't we go to London on Saturday and see a show? We had to raise £60,000 to stage the show. We had a puppet show for Jamie's birthday party.
See also

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  • show noun (PUBLIC EVENT)

B2 [C] an event at which a group of related things are available for the public to look at: a fashion/flower show There were some amazing new cars at the motor show. They put on a retrospective show of his work at the National Museum of American Art.
on show
C1 Something that is on show has been made available for the public to look at: Her sculptures will be on show at the museum until the end of the month.

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  • show noun (EXPRESSION)

[C] an action that makes other people know what your feelings, beliefs, or qualities are: In a show of solidarity, the management and workers have joined forces to campaign against the closure of the factory. Over 100 military vehicles paraded through the capital in a show of strength.
a good, poor, etc. show
an activity or piece of work that appears to be done with great, little, etc. effort: She may not have won, but she certainly put up a good show.
  • show noun (FALSE APPEARANCE)

[C] an appearance of something that is not really sincere or real: Despite its public show of unity, the royal family had its share of disagreements just like any other. They put on a show of being interested, but I don't think they really were.
for show
Something that is for show has no practical value and is used only to improve the appearance of something else: Do the lights on this phone have any useful function or are they just/only for show?
(Definition of show from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"show" in Business English

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shownoun [C]

uk   /ʃəʊ/ us  
MARKETING, COMMERCE an event at which goods and services, or information about them, are displayed so that people can decide whether to buy them: a fashion/technology/trade show We try to schedule our show ahead of Tucson so dealers can leave here and go straight there. What is the future of green automotive business at the Detroit auto show?
COMMUNICATIONS a broadcast on television or radio: You can watch reruns of the show on the Internet. a television/TV/radio show a news/reality/cooking showa show about sth We saw a show about the space program.a show on sth I love that new show on the history channel.
a show of hands
a situation in which people raise one of their hands to show that they support or agree with something or in order to vote for something: Very few attendees belonged to senior management, according to a show of hands.
on show
available for people to see: An exhibition of her photographs is currently on show in London.
(Definition of show from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“show” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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