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Definition of “show” - English Dictionary

"show" in American English

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showverb

 us   /ʃoʊ/
  • show verb (MAKE SEEN)

[T] (past tense showed, past participle shown  /ʃoʊn/ ) to ​cause or ​allow something to be ​seen: You should show that ​rash to ​yourdoctor. These ​trees show the ​effects of ​acidrain. He’s ​starting to show his ​age.
  • show verb (EXPRESS)

[T] (past tense showed, past participle shown  /ʃoʊn/ ) to ​expressyourfeelings or ​opinion by ​youractions or words: I do not ​know how to show my ​thanks for all ​yourhelp. He is a ​scrappylawyer and shows no ​mercy to any ​opponent.
  • show verb (EXPLAIN)

[T] (past tense showed, past participle shown  /ʃoʊn/ ) to ​explain something to someone by ​helping to do it or by giving ​instructions or ​examples to ​copy: [+ question word] The ​diagram shows how to ​fit the ​pieces together.
  • show verb (PROVE)

[T] (past tense showed, past participle shown  /ʃoʊn/ ) to make something ​clear or ​prove something to be ​true: Your writing shows you can be a good ​writer. He has shown himself to be ​unreliable.
  • show verb (BE NOTICEABLE)

[I/T] (past tense showed, past participle shown  /ʃoʊn/ ) to be ​able to be ​seen or ​noticed, or to make something ​noticeable: [I] I’ve been ​working for ​hours, and I’ve got nothing to show for it.
  • show verb (LEAD)

[T] (past tense showed, past participle shown  /ʃoʊn/ ) to ​lead someone ​somewhere or to ​point out something: Could you show me the way to the ​postoffice? Show me which ​cake you ​want.
  • show verb (RECORD)

[T] (past tense showed, past participle shown  /ʃoʊn/ ) to ​record or ​express an ​amount, ​number, or ​measurement: My ​barometer shows a ​change in the ​weather is coming.
  • show verb (APPEAR)

[I] to ​appear at a ​gathering or ​event: Jenny said she'd be here, but she never showed.
  • show verb (MAKE PUBLIC EVENT)

[I/T] (past tense showed, past participle shown  /ʃoʊn/ ) to make an artist's ​workavailable for the ​public to ​see: [T] This ​gallery is a ​place where ​youngartists can show ​theirwork.
[I/T] (past tense showed, past participle shown  /ʃoʊn/ ) To show a ​movie is to ​offer it for ​viewing in a ​movietheater or on ​television: [T] That ​channel often shows ​foreignfilms.

shownoun

 us   /ʃoʊ/
  • show noun (ENTERTAINMENT)

[C] a ​performance in a ​theater, a ​movie, or a ​television or ​radioprogram: a ​stage/​talk show
  • show noun (PUBLIC EVENT)

[C] an ​event at which the ​public can ​view a ​particularcollection of things: a ​flower show a ​fashion show
  • show noun (ACTIVITY)

[U] infml an ​activity, ​business, or ​organization, ​considered in ​relation to who is ​managing it: Who will ​run the show when the ​bossretires?
  • show noun (APPEARANCE)

[C/U] an ​appearance of something that is not really ​sincere or ​real: [C] Ray made a show of ​reaching for his ​wallet. [U] Does this ​fireplacework or is it just for show? [U] Half for show and ​half in ​realanger, I ​stood up and ​shouted, “I'm not ​yourfriend!”
(Definition of show from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"show" in British English

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showverb

uk   /ʃəʊ/  us   /ʃoʊ/ (showed, shown)
  • show verb (MAKE SEEN)

A1 [T] to make it ​possible for something to be ​seen: [+ two objects] Let me show you this new ​book I've just ​bought. On this ​map, ​urbanareas are shown ingrey. You ought to show that ​rash toyourdoctor. [+ obj + question word ] Why won't you show me what's in ​yourhand? [+ obj + -ing verb ] The ​secretlyfilmedvideo shows the ​prince and ​princesskissing. These ​photographs show the effects of the ​chemical on the ​trees. He ​began to show signs of ​recovery. "This is a ​Victoriangoldcoin." "Is it? Show me (= ​allow me to ​see it)."

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  • show verb (RECORD)

B1 [T] to ​record or ​express a ​number or ​measurement: The ​right-handdial shows the ​temperature, and the ​left-hand one shows the ​airpressure. The ​company showed a ​loss of $2 million last ​year. The ​latestcrimefigures show a ​sharprise in ​burglaries.

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  • show verb (EXPLAIN)

B1 [T] to ​explain something to someone, by doing it or by giving ​instructions or ​examples: [+ question word] Can you show me how to set the ​DVDplayer? This ​dictionarycontains many ​examples that show how words are ​actually used. Could you show me the way to the ​busstation?

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  • show verb (PROVE)

B2 [T] to ​prove something or make the ​truth or ​existence of something ​known: She has shown herself (to be) a ​highlycompetentmanager. His ​diaries show him to have been an ​extremelyinsecureperson. [+ (that)] The ​diaries show (that) he was very ​insecure. Show me (that) I can ​trust you. [+ question word] Our ​research has shown (us) how little we ​know about this ​disease.

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  • show verb (EXPRESS)

B2 [T] to ​expressideas or ​feelings using ​actions or words: He ​finds it ​difficult to show ​affection. She showed ​enormouscourage when she ​rescued him from the ​fire. [+ two objects] You should show ​yourparents more ​respect/show more ​respect toyourparents.

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  • show verb (NOTICEABLE)

C1 [I] to be ​easy to ​see or ​notice: "Oh no, I've ​spilledredwine on my ​jacket!" "Don't ​worry, it doesn't show." Whatever she's ​thinking, she never ​lets it show. I've ​painted over the ​graffititwice, but it still shows through. The ​drug does not show up in ​bloodtests because it is ​effective in very ​smallquantities. When we ​moved in, the ​house hadn't been ​decorated for 20 ​years, and it showed.
See also
show your age
to ​look as ​old as you really are: Recently, he's really starting to show his ​age.

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  • show verb (PUBLIC EVENT)

[T] to make an artist's ​workavailable for the ​public to ​see: Our ​aim is to make it ​easier for ​youngunknownartists to show ​theirwork.
[I or T] If a ​cinema or ​televisionstation shows a ​film or ​programme, or if a ​film or ​programme is showing ​somewhere, you can ​see it there: It's the first ​time this ​movie has been shown on ​television. Now showing at a ​cinema near you!
  • show verb (FAIL TO HIDE)

[T] to ​fail to ​hide something, or to make it ​possible to ​see or ​know something that is not ​intended to be ​seen or ​known: Your shirt's so ​thin that it shows ​yourbra. Light-coloured ​carpets show the ​dirt. [+ question word] His ​failure in the ​exams shows (up) just howbad his ​teachers are.

shownoun

uk   /ʃəʊ/  us   /ʃoʊ/
  • show noun (ENTERTAINMENT)

A2 [C] a ​theatreperformance or a ​television or ​radioprogramme that is ​entertainingrather than ​serious: a radio/​television/​stage show a quiz/​game show Why don't we go to London on ​Saturday and see a show? We had to ​raise £60,000 to stage the show. We had a puppet show for Jamie's ​birthdayparty.
See also

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  • show noun (PUBLIC EVENT)

B2 [C] an ​event at which a ​group of ​related things are ​available for the ​public to ​look at: a fashion/​flower show There were some ​amazing new ​cars at the motor show. They put on a retrospective show of his ​work at the National Museum of American Art.
on show
C1 Something that is on show has been made ​available for the ​public to ​look at: Her ​sculptures will be on show at the ​museum until the end of the ​month.

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  • show noun (EXPRESSION)

[C] an ​action that makes other ​peopleknow what ​yourfeelings, ​beliefs, or ​qualities are: In a show ofsolidarity, the ​management and ​workers have ​joinedforces to ​campaign against the ​closure of the ​factory. Over 100 ​militaryvehiclesparaded through the ​capital in a show of strength.
a good, poor, etc. show
an ​activity or ​piece of ​work that ​appears to be done with ​great, little, etc. ​effort: She may not have ​won, but she ​certainly put up a good show.
  • show noun (FALSE APPEARANCE)

[C] an ​appearance of something that is not really ​sincere or ​real: Despite ​itspublic show ofunity, the ​royalfamily had ​itsshare of ​disagreements just like any other. They put on a show of beinginterested, but I don't ​think they really were.
for show
Something that is for show has no ​practicalvalue and is used only to ​improve the ​appearance of something ​else: Do the ​lights on this ​phone have any ​usefulfunction or are they just/only for show?
(Definition of show from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"show" in Business English

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shownoun [C]

uk   us   /ʃəʊ/
MARKETING, COMMERCE an ​event at which ​goods and ​services, or ​information about them, are ​displayed so that ​people can decide whether to ​buy them: a fashion/​technology/​trade show We ​try to ​schedule our show ​ahead of Tucson so ​dealers can ​leave here and go ​straight there. What is the future of ​greenautomotivebusiness at the Detroit auto show?
COMMUNICATIONS a ​broadcast on ​television or radio: You can watch reruns of the show on the ​Internet. atelevision/TV/radio show anews/reality/cooking showa show about sth We saw a show about the ​spaceprogram.a show on sth I love that new show on the ​historychannel.
a show of hands
a ​situation in which ​peopleraise one of their ​hands to show that they ​support or ​agree with something or in ​order to ​vote for something: Very few ​attendees belonged to ​seniormanagement, according to a show of ​hands.
on show
available for ​people to see: An ​exhibition of her photographs is ​currently on show in London.
(Definition of show from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“show” in Business English

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