sign Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “sign” - English Dictionary

Definition of "sign" - American English Dictionary

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signnoun [C]

 us   /sɑɪn/

sign noun [C] (MARK)

a written or ​printedmark that has a ​standardmeaning: The ​symbol for ​subtraction is the ​minus sign.

sign noun [C] (PUBLIC INFORMATION)

a ​device that gives ​information to ​people who ​see it: a ​stop sign A ​neon sign ​marked the ​entrance to the ​parkinggarage.

sign noun [C] (BODY MOVEMENT)

a ​movement of the ​hands or ​body that gives ​information or an ​instruction: He ​kept giving me the cut-throat sign to end the ​speech.

sign noun [C] (SIGNAL)

a ​signal that something ​exists or that ​shows what might ​happen in the ​future: She was at least ​sharing her ​problems with me, and that was a sign of ​progress. There was nobody in the ​place, and I ​thought that was a ​bad sign. There are signs that he is ​thinking of ​running for ​president.

signverb

 us   /sɑɪn/

sign verb (WRITE)

[I/T] to write ​yourname on a ​document to show that you ​agree with it or that you have written it yourself: [T] to sign a ​letter/​contract/​check [I] Please sign for the ​package when it ​arrives (= write ​yourname on a ​form to show that you have ​received it). [I/T] If an ​organization signs someone, that ​person has ​officiallybecome a ​member of the ​organization by ​agreeing to a ​contract: [T] The ​team signed four new ​players this ​week.

sign verb (COMMUNICATE)

to ​communicate by using ​handmovements: [+ that clause] He signed that he’d be ​ready in five ​minutes.
(Definition of sign from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "sign" - British English Dictionary

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signverb

uk   us   /saɪn/

sign verb (WRITE)

B1 [I or T] to write ​yourname, usually on a written or ​printeddocument, to show that you ​agree with ​itscontents or have written or ​created it yourself: to sign a ​letter/​cheque/​contract/​lease/​agreement Sign here, ​please. He signed his ​name at the end of the ​letter. [+ obj + noun ] He signed himself "​Mark Taylor". She said the ​painting was by Picasso, but it wasn't signed. [T] in ​sport, to make a ​legal written ​agreement to ​employ a ​player: The ​team has just signed a new ​player.
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sign verb (BODY MOVEMENT)

[T or I] to give an ​order or ​information, or make a ​request, using ​hand and ​bodymovements: [+ to infinitive] He signed for/to the ​waiter tobring him another ​drink. [+ that] He signed to the ​waiter that he ​wanted another ​drink. [I or T] to use sign ​language (= ​language used by ​people who cannot ​hear or ​talk)

signnoun [C]

uk   us   /saɪn/

sign noun [C] (NOTICE)

A2 a ​notice giving ​information, ​directions, a ​warning, etc.: a ​road sign a ​shop sign
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sign noun [C] (BODY MOVEMENT)

B1 a ​movement of the ​body that gives ​information or an ​instruction: She ​pointed to her ​watch as a sign that it was getting late and she ​wanted to ​leave. He made/gave a sign to his ​boyfriend tostoptalking. The ​priest made the sign of the ​cross (= made the ​shape of a ​cross by ​moving his ​hand between four ​points on his ​chest) when he ​entered the ​church.
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sign noun [C] (SHOWING)

B1 something ​showing that something ​elseexists or might ​happen or ​exist in the ​future: His ​inability to ​handle the ​situation is a ​sure sign ofweakness. [+ that] The ​fact that he's ​eating more is a sign that he's ​feelingbetter. I've ​searched for my ​hat, but there's no sign of it ​anywhere (= I can't ​find it). There was no sign of ​life in the ​building (= there ​seemed to be no one in it). Billy's ​work at ​school has shown signs ofimprovement this ​year. There is every sign that/All the signs are that the ​worst is over.
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sign noun [C] (MARK)

B2 a written or ​printedmark that has a ​standardmeaning: + and - are ​mathematical signs. £ is the sign for the British ​pound.
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(Definition of sign from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "sign" - Business English Dictionary

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signverb

uk   us   /saɪn/
[I or T] to write your ​name, usually on a written or ​printeddocument, for ​example to show that you ​agree with its ​contents or have written or ​created it yourself: sign a contract/agreement/declaration We've already ​agreed the details and I just need to sign a ​contract. sign a ​letter/​form/​cheque Please sign your name below if you are ​available to ​help. Sign here please.
signed and sealed (also signed, sealed, and delivered) finished and ​official because all the necessary ​documents have been signed: The ​project can ​start now that the ​contract has been signed and ​sealed.
sign on the dotted line to ​agree to do something, especially by signing an ​agreement: Many ​people sign on the dotted ​line without reading their ​policydocuments.

signnoun [C]

uk   us   /saɪn/
a ​flatobject giving ​information, directions, a ​warning, etc.: The ​store had a handwritten sign in the ​window. A sign ​advertising the closing-down ​sale was clearly visible from the road. road/​shop/street signs
a written or ​printedmark that has a ​standardmeaning: + is the ​plus sign and % is the ​percentage sign.
something that ​shows that something else exists or might ​happen or exist in the future: a sign of sth His inability to ​handle the ​situation is a sure sign of ​weakness. a sign that There are signs that the ​economy is ​improving Neither ​side is showing signs ofbacking down. All the signs are that the worst is over.
(Definition of sign from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“sign” in Business English

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