Definition of “silent” - English Dictionary

“silent” in British English

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silentadjective

uk /ˈsaɪ.lənt/ us /ˈsaɪ.lənt/

silent adjective (QUIET)

B1 without any sound:

The empty house was completely silent.
literary It was four o'clock in the morning and the streets were as silent as the grave (= completely silent).

More examples

  • We were struck by the silent grandeur of the desert.
  • The house seemed preternaturally silent.
  • The house, usually bustling with activity, was strangely silent.
  • The valley was silent.
  • We walked into the silent church.

silent adjective (NO SPEAKING)

B2 without talking:

She whispered a silent prayer that her wounded brother would not die.
The police officer told the criminal that he had the right to remain silent.
He was silent on/about his plans for the future.
Arthur has always been the strong, silent type (= a type of person, usually a man, who says very little).

More examples

  • Later Mr Ashby left the court, grim-faced and silent.
  • He gritted his teeth in silent fury.
  • We applaud the family's decision to remain silent over the issue.
  • We can't assume the suspects to be guilty simply because they've decided to remain silent.
  • He looked happy for a brief while, before relapsing into silent misery.
silently
adverb uk /ˈsaɪ.lənt.li/ us /ˈsaɪ.lənt.li/

silentnoun [ U ]

uk /ˈsaɪ.lənt/ us /ˈsaɪ.lənt/

(Definition of “silent” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“silent” in American English

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silentadjective

us /ˈsɑɪ·lənt/

silent adjective (NOT SPEAKING)

not speaking or making noise:

I have remained silent till now, Mike, but I have to tell you what I think.

If a letter in a word is silent, it is not pronounced:

The "b" in doubt is silent.

silent adjective (QUIET)

completely quiet:

Madeleine turned back down the empty, silent street.

(Definition of “silent” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)