skip Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “skip” - English Dictionary

Definition of "skip" - American English Dictionary

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skipverb

 us   /skɪp/

skip verb (MOVE)

[I] (-pp-) to move ​lightly and ​quickly, esp. with ​smalldancing or ​jumpingsteps: He skipped off to ​school.

skip verb (LEAVE)

[I/T] (-pp-) infml to ​leave a ​placequickly: [T] Mark took the ​money and then skipped ​town.

skip verb (AVOID)

[T] to not do or have something; ​avoid: Martin skipped fifth ​grade. I skipped ​lunch today.
(Definition of skip from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "skip" - British English Dictionary

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skipverb

uk   us   /skɪp/ (-pp-)

skip verb (MOVE)

[I usually + adv/prep] to ​movelightly and ​quickly, making a ​smalljump after each ​step: She ​watched her little ​granddaughter skip down the ​path. The ​lambs were skipping about in the ​field.

skip verb (JUMP)

[I] (US jump rope, skip rope) to ​jumplightly over a ​rope that is ​held in both ​yourhands, or by two other ​people, and ​turnedrepeatedly under ​yourlegs and over ​yourhead as ​exercise or a ​game: Sports ​players often ​train by skipping.

skip verb (LEAVE)

C1 [I or T] to ​leave one thing or ​place, ​especiallyquickly, in ​order to go to another: This ​part of the ​book isn't very ​interesting, so I'm going to skip (over) it. The ​teacherkept skipping from one ​subject to another so it was ​difficult to ​follow what he was saying.UK We're skipping over/​across/off (= making a ​quickjourney) to France for the ​day. The ​policethink that the ​bankrobbers must have skipped (= ​left) the ​country by now.UK She skipped off/out (= ​leftquickly and/or ​secretly) without saying ​goodbye.

skip verb (AVOID)

B2 [T] informal to not do or not have something that you usually do or that you should do; to ​avoid: I'm ​trying to ​loseweight, so I'm skipping (= not ​eating) lunch today.US Should ​parents have to ​pay if ​theirchild skips school?US I skipped class and went to the ​parkinstead.

skip verb (THROW)

[T] US (UK skim) to ​throw a ​flatstone horizontally over ​water so that it ​touches and ​rises off the ​surface several ​times: We ​watched a ​child skipping ​stonesacross the ​lake.
Phrasal verbs

skipnoun [C]

uk   us   /skɪp/

skip noun [C] (CONTAINER)

UK (US trademark Dumpster) a ​largemetalcontainer into which ​people put ​unwantedobjects or ​building or ​gardenwaste, and which is ​brought to and taken away from a ​place by a ​specialtruck when ​peopleask for it

skip noun [C] (MOVE)

a ​small, ​light, ​dancing or ​jumpingstep: She gave a little skip of ​joy.
(Definition of skip from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "skip" - Business English Dictionary

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skipnoun [C]

uk   us   /skɪp/ UK (US Dumpster) TRANSPORT
a large metal ​container used for getting rid of rubbish, old ​buildingmaterials, etc. Skips are ​removed using a ​truck: Most of the ​waste was thrown into a skip.
(Definition of skip from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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