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Definition of “slant” - English Dictionary

"slant" in American English

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slantverb

 us   /slænt/
  • slant verb (LEAN)

[I] to lean in a diagonal direction, or to cause (something) to slope: Rays of sunlight slanted down on her.
  • slant verb (GIVE OPINION)

[T] to present information by ignoring or hiding some things and emphasizing other things: He was known to slant reports, writing what his boss wanted to hear.

slantnoun

 us   /slænt/
  • slant noun (OPINION)

[C] someone’s opinion about a subject that is expressed by ignoring or hiding some information and emphasizing other information: He put his own liberal slant on the general’s writings.
  • slant noun (SLOPE)

[U] a position that is leaning or sloping: Most ocean beaches are on a slant.
(Definition of slant from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"slant" in British English

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slantverb

uk   /slɑːnt/  us   /slænt/
[I or T] to (cause to) lean in a position that is not vertical; to (cause to) slope: Italic writing slants to the right. The evening sun slanted (= shone with the light moving in a slope) through the narrow window.
[T] often disapproving to present information in a particular way, especially showing one group of people, one side of an argument, etc. in such a positive or negative way that it is unfair: The police claimed that reports in the media were slanted against/towards the defendant.

slantnoun

uk   /slɑːnt/  us   /slænt/
slantwise
adverb uk   /ˈslɑːnt.waɪz/  us   /ˈslænt.waɪz/ (US also slantways)
(Definition of slant from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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