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Definition of “slip up” - English Dictionary

"slip up" in American English

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slip up

phrasal verb with slip  us   /slɪp/ verb (-pp-)
to make a ​smallmistake, often as a ​result of not ​thinkingcarefully: It's ​easy for a ​journalist to slip up and use somebody else's ​idea without ​crediting him or her.

slip-upnoun [C]

 us   /ˈslɪpˌʌp/
a ​mistake that someone makes by not giving something enough ​attention: That slip-up ​cost a lot of ​money.
(Definition of slip up from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







(Definition of slip up from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"slip up" in Business English

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slip up

phrasal verb with slip uk   us   /slɪp/ verb (-pp-)
[I] to make a mistake: We can't ​afford to ​slip up when we're ​risking so much ​money. There is a ​solution for ​taxpayers who have ​slipped up and not ​paid on ​time.
See also

slip-upnoun [C]

uk   us  
a careless mistake: The ​candidate often blamed others when he made slip-ups.a slip-up in sth There have been several slip-ups in the handing of ​secretinformation.
(Definition of slip up from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “slip up”
in Arabic يَرتَكِب خَطأ…
in Korean 실수를 하다…
in Portuguese cometer um deslize, erro…
in Catalan equivocar-se…
in Japanese うっかり間違える, 失敗する…
in Chinese (Simplified) 犯错误,疏忽…
in Turkish yanılmak, hata yapmak…
in Russian ошибаться…
in Chinese (Traditional) 犯錯誤,疏忽…
in Italian sbagliare…
in Polish pomylić się…
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“slip up” in Business English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
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April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

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