slow Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Definition of “slow” - English Dictionary

"slow" in American English

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slowadjective [-er/-est only]

 us   /sloʊ/
lackingspeed; not ​fast or ​quick: He was ​far too slow to ​catch me. We were slow to ​understand how we could use ​computers in ​ourwork. A ​clock or ​watch that is slow ​shows a ​time that is ​earlier than the ​correcttime. A ​person who is slow does not ​understand or ​learn things ​quickly: a ​class for slower ​students
slow
adverb [-er/-est only]  us   /sloʊ/
You’re ​driving too slow.
slowly
adverb  us   /ˈsloʊ·li/
The ​medication took ​effect slowly.

slowverb [I/T]

 us   /sloʊ/
to ​reducespeed or ​activity, or to make something do this: [I] Traffic ​slowed to a ​crawl. [T] There's still a ​chance to slow the ​spread of the ​disease.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of slow from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"slow" in British English

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slowadjective

uk   /sləʊ/  us   /sloʊ/
  • slow adjective (NOT FAST)

A1 moving, ​happening, or doing something without much ​speed: a slow ​runner/​driver/​reader She's a very slow ​eater. We're making slow but ​steadyprogress with the ​painting. The ​government was very slow toreact to the ​problem. Business is always slow during those ​months because everyone's on ​holiday.
Opposite

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • slow adjective (NOT EXCITING)

B2 used to ​describe a ​film, ​book, ​play, etc. that does not have much ​excitement and ​action: His ​films are so slow they ​send me to ​sleep.
  • slow adjective (NOT CLEVER)

A ​person might be ​described as slow if they are not very ​clever and do not ​understand or ​notice things ​quickly: I ​feel so slow when I'm with Andrew - he's so much ​brighter than me. I was a ​bit slow on the ​uptake there - I didn't ​follow his ​reasoning at all.
See also
  • slow adjective (TIME)

If a ​clock or ​watch is slow, it ​shows a ​time that is ​earlier than the ​realtime: That ​clock is ten ​minutes slow.

slowverb [I or T]

uk   /sləʊ/  us   /sloʊ/
C2 to ​reducespeed or ​activity, or to make something do this: Business ​development has slowed in ​response to the ​recession. Traffic slows to a ​crawl (= goes so ​slowly it ​almoststops) during ​rushhour. The ​pilot was ​asked to slow his ​approach to the ​runway.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

slowadverb

uk   /sləʊ/  us   /sloʊ/
(Definition of slow from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"slow" in Business English

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slowadjective

uk   us   /sləʊ/
happening without much ​speed: slow growth/progress/recovery Small ​companies are making a slow ​recovery from the ​recession. Growth in this ​sector has been slower than ​predicted. Despite a rather slow ​start, the month ​ended well. The slow ​pace of ​recovery in the ​labormarket could not be denied.be slow to do sth The ​company was slow to ​react to ​changingmarketconditions.
if ​business, ​sales, etc. are slow, there is very little ​activity: Business is always slow during summer ​vacation. slow months/​season

slowverb [I or T]

uk   us   /sləʊ/
to become slower or less ​active or to make something slower or less ​active: The ​market is slowing to some extent.slow dramatically/sharply/significantly Consumer ​spending has already slowed quite ​sharply. Economic ​growth is expected to slow. Their ​aim is to slow ​inflation in the ​housingmarket. Several unexpected problems slowed ​progress on the ​project.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of slow from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“slow” in Business English

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