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Definition of “slow” - English Dictionary

"slow" in American English

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slowadjective [-er/-est only]

 us   /sloʊ/
lacking speed; not fast or quick: He was far too slow to catch me. We were slow to understand how we could use computers in our work.
A clock or watch that is slow shows a time that is earlier than the correct time.
A person who is slow does not understand or learn things quickly: a class for slower students
slow
adverb [-er/-est only]  us   /sloʊ/
You’re driving too slow.
slowly
adverb  us   /ˈsloʊ·li/
The medication took effect slowly.

slowverb [I/T]

 us   /sloʊ/
to reduce speed or activity, or to make something do this: [I] Traffic slowed to a crawl. [T] There's still a chance to slow the spread of the disease.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of slow from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"slow" in British English

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slowadjective

uk   /sləʊ/  us   /sloʊ/
  • slow adjective (NOT FAST)

A1 moving, happening, or doing something without much speed: a slow runner/driver/reader She's a very slow eater. We're making slow but steady progress with the painting. The government was very slow to react to the problem. Business is always slow during those months because everyone's on holiday.
Opposite

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • slow adjective (TIME)

If a clock or watch is slow, it shows a time that is earlier than the real time: That clock is ten minutes slow.

slowverb [I or T]

uk   /sləʊ/  us   /sloʊ/
C2 to reduce speed or activity, or to make something do this: Business development has slowed in response to the recession. Traffic slows to a crawl (= goes so slowly it almost stops) during rush hour. The pilot was asked to slow his approach to the runway.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

slowadverb

uk   /sləʊ/  us   /sloʊ/
(Definition of slow from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"slow" in Business English

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slowadjective

uk   us   /sləʊ/
happening without much speed: slow growth/progress/recovery Small companies are making a slow recovery from the recession. Growth in this sector has been slower than predicted. Despite a rather slow start, the month ended well. The slow pace of recovery in the labor market could not be denied.be slow to do sth The company was slow to react to changing market conditions.
if business, sales, etc. are slow, there is very little activity: Business is always slow during summer vacation. slow months/season

slowverb [I or T]

uk   us   /sləʊ/
to become slower or less active or to make something slower or less active: The market is slowing to some extent.slow dramatically/sharply/significantly Consumer spending has already slowed quite sharply. Economic growth is expected to slow. Their aim is to slow inflation in the housing market. Several unexpected problems slowed progress on the project.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of slow from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“slow” in Business English

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